After Your Unemployment Benefits End… ?

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(MONEY TALKS NEWS) – If losing a job wasn’t tough enough, imagine those unemployment checks disappearing from your mailbox. Despite extensions of benefits, millions of Americans are facing that possibility.

“Without it, I don’t know what I would do. Especially now that it’s non-taxed. It gives me the freedom to have a little bit of breathing room,” Lisa Sculnick tells Money Talks News.

Sculnick is depending on unemployment checks to survive. After being let go from a good paying job with benefits, she now fears the worst. Losing everything before receiving a payroll check from a new employer.

The story is similar around the Country, but what do you do if your unemployment runs out? Step One is to Step up the search. Employment experts say, forget sitting home on your computer all day looking.

“The first month I was unemployed, that’s all I did. I was on the computer every weekday, every moment. That’s what I did. You actually have to get out. Because most of the jobs that are out there you get from meeting other people. Talking to people” Sculnick adds.

Long before the Internet, those seeking work had to do all the legwork. Thinking outside the box will help you land a good job. Try attending seminars, workshops, even doing charity or other work for free. Temporary work agencies like Manpower and Kelly can help you find some part-time work.

“We have job-seekers now that are working in jobs that they thought they would never do. They’re working now to survive. Hopefully grow and thrive later, but right now it’s all about survival,” said Tony Ash with Workforce One.

Ash tells Money Talks News, it’s important to maintain a schedule as if you were employed. Wake up at 8am and stop looking for work at 5pm.

Even with extended benefits, the jobless nature of this recovery could ultimately lead to hundreds of thousands of Americans without an unemployment check and without a job. But that doesn’t mean there’s no help or no hope if you’re willing to look and be humble.

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  • Donna

    I agree that we should network. The idea that any meeting or contact could potentially be some sort of an opportunity for any one of us, employed or otherwise. However, I know in my circumstance of trying to meet our budget and failing I can’t afford to hop in my vehicle to drive 16 miles into the city for face-time and networking opportunities for several days with or without success. I just don’t have the money to burn in gas for intentional networking. To me, it’s a risk and I can’t afford financial risks right now.

    But, again, networking when the opportuntiy is available and free – as in, I can piggy-back on another function – most definitely!!

    In the interim, what do we do when the benefits run out and there is no employment and job hunting is truly expensive?

    Thanks!

  • Douglas

    “Loosing” a job?
    Come on guys. How can I respect your stories when the spelling isn't even correct?
    If you need a proofreader, I'm more than available.