2014 Marks the End of Incandescent Light

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Americans will have to say goodbye to standard incandescent light bulbs and get accustomed to more pricey alternatives that use a lot less electricity.

The era of incandescent light bulbs has come to an end in 2014.

USA Today reports:

Starting Jan. 1, the United States will no longer manufacture or import incandescent bulbs – although stores can still sell what they have in stock. The phaseout is a result of federal rules to switch to more energy-efficient bulbs.

While the newest bulbs give consumers a much longer-lasting light and use a lot less electricity, some people seem reluctant to switch. One reason may be the higher cost of the new bulbs. CFLs cost a few dollars, and LED bulbs may cost $10 or $20, while incandescent bulbs are only about 70 cents, USA Today says.

While the new bulbs will lower a family’s spending on electricity, it’s not by a huge amount because the average household doesn’t spend a lot on lighting. Reports USA Today:

Home improvement store Lowe’s did a study comparing electricity costs of an LED vs. an incandescent bulb. Energy costs for the LED added up to $30 over the bulb’s 22-year lifespan. Energy costs for using an incandescent bulb over that same period added up to $165 – savings, certainly, but perhaps not significant enough for many homeowners over two decades to alter their buying habits

Of course, once the selection of incandescent bulbs runs out, you’ll have no choice but to go with the energy-efficient bulbs. In this video, Money Talks News money expert Stacy Johnson explains how to go about making the switch.

What are your thoughts on the phaseout of old-fashioned light bulbs, which produce a lot more heat than they do light? Let us know in the comments below or on our Facebook page.

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