Urge to Splurge? Here’s Your Excuse

If you’ve been looking for an excuse to treat yourself, your search is over. National Splurge Day is June 18. It’s the perfect excuse to spend a little extra on yourself (or someone else).

How would you splurge? Coupon destination site RetailMeNot says most Americans have conflicting ideas about what defines a “splurge” purchase.

A recent RetailMeNot survey revealed the following:

  • Cha-ching. More than half of consumers consider these to be splurges – jewelry (63 percent), event tickets (59 percent) and electronics (54 percent). One interesting note: Married Americans are more likely to view jewelry as a splurge than unmarried consumers (67 to 59 percent).
  • Designer duds. American consumers are four times more likely to consider designer clothing as a splurge (62 percent) than non-designer apparel (15 percent).
  • Fancy food. Sixty-six percent of consumers think a meal at an expensive restaurant is a splurge, compared with 26 percent of people who say an average-priced restaurant is. Apparently Republicans (at 72 percent) are more likely than Democrats (at 64 percent) to consider an expensive meal a splurge.

I’m fairly frugal in my shopping, except when it comes to eating out. I live in a small town that’s incredibly restaurant-challenged (unless you have a craving for fast food, pizza or steak). When I’m out of town, I am more than willing to splurge on a good meal (like seafood, Italian or Thai) that I’m not able to eat in my hometown. I also tend to spend more money on beauty and cosmetic items because I’ve found that a little extra money usually equates to better quality.

Check out DealNews.com for a list of items they’ve deemed splurge-worthy.

What do you consider a splurge purchase? Are there items you think are worthy of splurging on? Share your comments below or on our Facebook page.

Sign up for our free newsletter

Like this article? Sign up for our newsletter and we'll send you a regular digest of our newest stories, full of money saving tips and advice, free! We'll also email you a PDF of Stacy Johnson's "205 Ways to Save Money" as soon as you've subscribed. It's full of great tips that'll help you save a ton of extra cash. It doesn't cost a dime, so why wait? Click here to sign up now.

Check out our hottest deals!

We're always adding new deals and coupons that'll save you big bucks. See the deals to the right and hundreds more in our Deals section.

Click here to explore 1,168 more deals!

Comments & discussion

We welcome your opinions, but let’s keep it civil. Like many businesses, we reserve the right to refuse service to anyone. In our case, that means those who communicate by name-calling, racism, using words designed to hurt others or generally acting like an uninformed bully. Also, comments that include links to email addresses or commercial websites typically aren't posted. This isn't a place to advertise your business.

  • Kerry Aggen

    That’s very interesting that married Americans tend to view jewelry purchases as “splurges” than unmarried Americans… Maybe, it’s that, as a committed couple, their shared goals include savings? Or, that ensuring their family has enough money for daily needs and necessities, that a lot of things are now considered “splurges”? Or, they’re purchasing a home and/or vehicle, so paying for those purchases becomes the main goal? It would be interesting to find out what their goals are, now that they’re a couple or family, and see how their financial goals have changed, which might shed a lot of light on why jewelry is now considered by most of them as “splurges.”