Don’t Get Burned by Drinkable Sunscreen

By on

Could sun protection be just a sip away?

A Colorado company says it has created a drinkable sunscreen that neutralizes UV radiation, protecting your skin from the sun’s harmful rays.

A 100-milliliter bottle of Osmosis Skin Harmonized Water for sun exposure sells for $30. Its ingredient list is short and sweet: distilled water and “multiple vibrational frequency blends.”

So how does ingestible sunscreen work? According to the Denver Business Journal, Dr. Ben Johnson, founder of Osmosis Skincare and Harmonized H2O, said all you need to do is drink 2 millilters of the water an hour before going in the sun and you’ll be protected from the sun’s harmful UV rays for about three hours.

He said the product is made by manipulating radio waves that naturally occur in water to give them UV-canceling properties, then duplicating that process hundreds of thousands of times, and bottling that water up.

Once people drink the solution, he said, it shares those solar-ray-canceling characteristics with the water already in their body and repels sunlight at the skin level.

“They neutralize the sun before it hits you,” Johnson said. “So we are radiating sun-protecting waves at a 97 percent level.”

If you think neutralizing UVA and UVB rays with vibrational frequencies sounds a little farfetched, join the club. The water is not approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, nor does it have independent scientific evidence to back up the product’s claims.

The American Academy of Dermatology released this statement about the so-called sunscreen:

This drink should not be used as a replacement for sunscreen or sun-protective clothing. There is currently no scientific evidence that this “drinkable sunscreen” product provides any protection from the sun’s damaging UV rays.

That was a nice response. Some dermatologists didn’t hold anything back. According to a WebMD blog:

“It’s ridiculous,” says David J. Leffell, MD, the David Paige Smith Professor of Dermatology & Surgery at Yale School of Medicine. “It’s scientific jibberish. Unless they are willing to present scientific, peer-reviewed data to support these claims, we have no choice but to dismiss it.”

If you really want to protect yourself from the sun, take your $30 and buy a bottle of SPF 30 and a wide-brimmed sun hat. You’ll probably have money left over to buy a cold drink and a new beach towel. At least you know that SPF lotions and head coverings provide sun protection that’s been tested and approved. Click here for a list of Consumer Reports’ recommended sunscreens.

What do you think about drinkable sunscreen? Share your thoughts below or on our Facebook page.

Sign up for our free newsletter

Like this article? Sign up for our newsletter and we'll send you a regular digest of our newest stories, full of money saving tips and advice, free! We'll also email you a PDF of Stacy Johnson's "205 Ways to Save Money" as soon as you've subscribed. It's full of great tips that'll help you save a ton of extra cash. It doesn't cost a dime, so why wait? Click here to sign up now.

Check out our hottest deals!

We're always adding new deals and coupons that'll save you big bucks. See the deals to the right and hundreds more in our Deals section.

Click here to explore 1,170 more deals!

Comments & discussion

We welcome your opinions, but let’s keep it civil. Like many businesses, we reserve the right to refuse service to anyone. In our case, that means those who communicate by name-calling, racism, using words designed to hurt others or generally acting like an uninformed bully. Also, comments that include links to email addresses or commercial websites typically aren't posted. This isn't a place to advertise your business.

  • Linda Royer

    That is the most ridiculous thing I ever heard in my life!!!!!! I would NEVER buy it!!!!!!

  • Y2KJillian

    See Linda Royer’s comment–I will double, triple, and quadruple down on it! Jillian

  • Doctor von Wer

    Fools and their money…..

  • SickOfFools

    Yep, there’s one born every minute.

  • pennyhammack

    Anyone silly enough to buy this has way too much disposable income and way too little common sense. Do they go around with an aluminum foil hat on too?