5 Credit Cards Tips for Trips Abroad

What's Hot

Do This or Your iPhone Bill May SkyrocketSave

23 Upgrades Under $50 to Make Your House Look AwesomeAround The House

Trump Worth $10 Billion Less Than If He’d Simply Invested in Index FundsBusiness

11 Places in the World Where You Can Afford to Retire in StyleMore

What You Need to Know for 2017 Obamacare EnrollmentFamily

8 Things Rich People Buy That Make Them Look DumbAround The House

32 of the Highest-Paid American SpeakersMake

Amazon Prime No Longer Pledges Free 2-Day Shipping on All ItemsMore

More Caffeine Means Less Dementia for WomenFamily

9 Tips to Ensure You’ll Have Enough to RetireFamily

5 DIY Ways to Make Your Car Smell GreatCars

30 Awesome Things to Do in RetirementCollege

5 Spots Where Retirees Can Live for Less Than $40,000Real Estate

10 Ways to Pull Together the Down Payment for a HomeCredit & Debt

10 Ways to Reduce Your Homeowner’s Insurance RatesFamily

50 Ways to Make a Fast $50 (or Lots More)Grow

When on the road, here's how to get the adventure without suffering outrageous credit card fees, fraud or theft.

This post comes from Gerri Detweiler at partner site Credit.com.

When you’re planning a trip to another country, talking with someone who has recently visited your destination can be one of the best ways to gather intel on what to bring — and what to leave at home. It only stands to reason that when it comes to paying for purchases overseas, it helps to talk with a traveler who knows the ropes.

During the past two decades, Kathleen Peddicord has traveled to more than 50 countries. An American citizen, she still keeps financial ties to the U.S., and as publisher of Live And Invest Overseas, she educates Americans on how to live and retire around the world. So she’s well acquainted with the ins and outs of using credit and debit cards when traveling abroad.

Here she shares five of her top tips for traveling with plastic, along with some traps to avoid.

1. Use the right card

While using a debit card helps you avoid the risk of overspending and returning home in debt, Peddicord recommends against using debit cards for purchases overseas “except as a last resort.” She says they are too easy to clone, and if your cards are fraudulently used, “it takes time to get cash credited back to a debit card account,” she warns. “Meantime, you don’t have access to that cash. Use a credit card for all purchases and your debit card for ATM withdrawals only,” she suggests.

When you do get money from an ATM, examine it carefully to make sure there isn’t a skimmer attached. These devices steal card information, allowing crooks to make copies of a card and drain the account. Also be sure to take your card at the end of the transaction; older machines still keep the card until the transaction is completed, and it’s easy to walk away and forget your card, “leaving it in the machine waiting for someone to come along and grab it. This isn’t uncommon,” she says.

2. Watch out for fees

Before using a credit card overseas, find out if the issuer charges foreign transaction fees, which can add 2 percent to 4 percent to each purchase. Peddicord recommends using a card with no foreign transaction fees, such as Capital One or Barclays. Discover cards also do not carry foreign transaction fees and there are others. (Here are some of the best travel credit cards.)

If you plan to use a debit card to get cash at ATMs while you are on the road, check the financial institution’s fee schedule first. There may be three charges for using an ATM overseas: one for using an out-of-network ATM, another one for using your card overseas (similar to a foreign transaction fee), and still another may be charged by the owner of the ATM.

A few financial institutions don’t charge fees for using an out-of-network ATM. “Schwab credits you when you are charged a fee, automatically refunding any ATM fee you are charged when you don’t use one of its bank machines (PLC Bank),” Peddicord says. “Another bank that credits ATM fees is Everbank. This is an online bank with its only branches in Florida.”

3. Bring extra

Conventional wisdom says the only cards to bring when you travel are the ones you plan to use. But Peddicord recommends you bring two debit cards and three credit cards. Why? Because foreign purchases can trigger your financial institution to temporarily suspend your account privileges because of the risk of fraud. While letting your card issuer know of your travel plans in advance may help, in her experience, it’s not foolproof.

“Use your card once or twice at foreign locations, and your card carrier can (and likely will) flag the ‘non-pattern’ behavior and cut off your card,” she warns. “I’ve had three cards cut off over the course of a few hours on some trips,” she says. In order to reactivate those cards, she’s had to call the card issuers to verify that she was the one using them. That takes time, of course. Carrying extra cards ensures you have backups if you don’t have time to go through that process while trying to complete a purchase.

Check Out Our Hottest Deals!

We're always adding new deals and coupons that'll save you big bucks. See the deals to the right and hundreds more in our Deals section.

Click here to explore 1,675 more deals!