5 Risky Things You’re Doing on Your Work Computer

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Work computers can pose big online security risks for companies. Here are a few ways you could be putting your company in a bad spot.

This post comes from Kelly Santos at partner site Credit.com.

With technology driving business growth, more companies are implementing bring-your-own-device policies in the workplace. Almost 2 in 3 IT professionals believe employee carelessness is connected to major data breaches that exposed customer information, according to a study by IT security firm Check Point.

With the risk of employees causing data breaches of customer and corporate information, employers should consider potential problem areas that could leave sensitive details vulnerable.

Here are five employee behaviors that could cause data breaches.

1. Browsing on social media 

Social media may be most dangerous for cybersecurity. About 36 percent of respondents log into their work computers to look at social media sites, according to a survey by GFI Software/Opinion Matters. While browsing through a friend’s post online looks harmless, massive data breaches in the past have been caused by social engineering attacks.

2. Shopping online

The same GFI Software survey said about one-third of all respondents used their work computers for online shopping. Since online retailers store financial information, cyberattackers may target those sites to steal information through unsecured connections and look for unencrypted information. People browsing on the Internet for purchases might also click on a link to a malware-infected site or suspicious websites requesting their credentials.

3. Downloading games on business devices

Although there are tons of games available online, many of these apps might be malware in disguise. Fake games were a major source of malware infections, especially on third-party app stores that are not equipped to scan for malicious software, Forbes reported.

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