7UP Sued Over Antioxidant Claims

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Wait, you mean artificially flavored soda doesn't contain real fruit?

The Center for Science in the Public Interest explains the lawsuit…

Despite the pictures of cherries, blackberries, cranberries, raspberries, and pomegranates on various 7UP labels, the drinks contain no fruit or juice of any kind. 7UP Cherry Antioxidant contains water, high-fructose corn syrup, citric acid, potassium benzoate, and the controversial dye Red 40. The Mixed Berry and Pomegranate varieties also contain Blue 1 dye. One 12-ounce serving contains 9 teaspoons (38 grams) of sugars and 140 calories. The diet versions replace the high-fructose corn syrup with the artificial sweeteners aspartame and acesulfame potassium.

In all six products, the added antioxidant is a small amount of vitamin E in the form of vitamin E acetate or d-alpha tocopherol acetate. But the purported health benefits of antioxidants are suggested by studies involving the consumption of whole fruits and vegetables, not artificially fortified foods, according to CSPI.

Soda doesn’t have health benefits? Shocker. But the lawsuit argues the products are misleading and FDA rules ban adding a tiny bit of something healthy to “nutritionally worthless” beverages.

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