An RV Park for the End of the World

What's Hot

23 Upgrades Under $50 to Make Your House Look AwesomeAround The House

Trump Worth $10 Billion Less Than If He’d Simply Invested in Index FundsBusiness

Do This or Your iPhone Bill May SkyrocketSave

19 Moves That Will Help You Retire Early and in StyleFamily

11 Places in the World Where You Can Afford to Retire in StyleMore

What You Need to Know for 2017 Obamacare EnrollmentFamily

The 35 Two-Year Colleges That Produce the Highest EarnersCollege

5 DIY Ways to Make Your Car Smell GreatCars

8 Things Rich People Buy That Make Them Look DumbAround The House

50 Ways to Make a Fast $50 (or Lots More)Grow

32 of the Highest-Paid American SpeakersMake

Amazon Prime No Longer Pledges Free 2-Day Shipping on All ItemsMore

5 Reasons a Roth IRA Should Be Part of Your Retirement PlanGrow

More Caffeine Means Less Dementia for WomenFamily

7 Household Hacks That Save You CashAround The House

30 Awesome Things to Do in RetirementCollege

Beware These 10 Retail Sales Tricks That Get You to Spend MoreMore

For all your survive-the-apocalypse needs, consider this cave, which features amenities ranging from a wine bar to meditation areas.

Robert Vicino is converting the majority of a 60-acre former military bunker into a post-apocalyptic resort because he feels called to do so.

Among other things, Vicino is the designer of Otto the Autopilot from the 1980 comedy movie “Airplane,” says. But he’s completely serious about this project, which he says was inspired by a spiritual message he received that warned of an “extinction event.”

For the past five years, Vicino has been developing locations to ride out the end of the world. There are six in various stages of completion, Vice says, each designed to hold 1,000 people or more.

The newest one, Vivos Survival Shelter & Resort, is being developed about 50 miles northwest of Kansas City and will hold about 5,000 people in its more than 2 million square feet, says. It’s for families with recreational vehicles, who will be able to park them inside. And by inside, I mean 130 feet underground.

Vicino described it as “a turnkey four-star underground hotel slash cruise ship” to Fox Business News. The Vivos website calls it “a virtual fortress with full-time security and protection devices, drive-thru blast doors that can withstand a nuclear blast from mere miles away, filtration systems for nuclear radiation and fallout, biological pathogens and chemical war gases.”

There are renderings of the layout, and lists of planned resort activities available underground and above ground (assuming nuclear fallout or a depleted ozone layer doesn’t preclude them, I guess).

The cost? A one-time membership fee of $1,000 per each foot of the RV’s length, plus $1,500 per person for a year’s supply of food, the site says. After lockdown, association fees are expected to be about $3 a month per foot.

That’s if you qualify. Vivos screens applicants based on their profession, education, expertise, skills, health, and other criteria. But “discrimination of any sort [will] not be allowed or tolerated,” the site says.

Planned amenities include a wine bar, helipad, hair salon, meditation areas, and hydroponic gardens, FastCoExist says. Those who have paid are welcome to visit any time, the Vivos site says — no need to wait until doomsday, which “can happen at any time, without notice, in 2013, 2019, 2029, 2036, or even 100 years from now.”

Stacy Johnson

It's not the usual blah, blah, blah

I know... every site you visit wants you to subscribe to their newsletter. But our news and advice is actually worth reading! For 25 years, I've been making people richer without making their eyes glaze over. You'll be glad you did. I guarantee it!


Read Next: 19 Cheap or Free Ways to Cut Your Winter Energy Bills

Check Out Our Hottest Deals!

We're always adding new deals and coupons that'll save you big bucks. See the deals to the right and hundreds more in our Deals section.

Click here to explore 1,712 more deals!