Can I Really Get a 0 Percent Car Loan?

What's Hot

23 Upgrades Under $50 to Make Your House Look AwesomeAround The House

Trump Worth $10 Billion Less Than If He’d Simply Invested in Index FundsBusiness

Do This or Your iPhone Bill May SkyrocketSave

11 Places in the World Where You Can Afford to Retire in StyleMore

19 Moves That Will Help You Retire Early and in StyleFamily

What You Need to Know for 2017 Obamacare EnrollmentFamily

8 Things Rich People Buy That Make Them Look DumbAround The House

50 Ways to Make a Fast $50 (or Lots More)Grow

32 of the Highest-Paid American SpeakersMake

The 35 Two-Year Colleges That Produce the Highest EarnersCollege

5 DIY Ways to Make Your Car Smell GreatCars

Amazon Prime No Longer Pledges Free 2-Day Shipping on All ItemsMore

More Caffeine Means Less Dementia for WomenFamily

7 Household Hacks That Save You CashAround The House

5 Reasons a Roth IRA Should Be Part of Your Retirement PlanGrow

30 Awesome Things to Do in RetirementCollege

Beware These 10 Retail Sales Tricks That Get You to Spend MoreMore

9 Tips to Ensure You’ll Have Enough to RetireFamily

Have you ever wondered about 0 percent auto financing? While interest-free financing isn’t always easy to get, even if you do qualify, you may not want it.

This post comes from Gerri Detweiler at partner site

Is 0 percent auto financing just a scam? That’s the question that popped in my mind recently when my mother-in-law, who is fastidious about her finances, was turned down for that rate when she bought a new car. If someone like her, who has a history of no missed payments on any of her bills and very minimal debt, can’t qualify, who can?

While it’s not a scam, interest-free financing isn’t always easy to get. And even if you do qualify, you may not want it.

“Typically 0 percent loans are used by the manufacturers as a low cost leader to generate showroom traffic,” says automotive credit expert Matt Briggs, CEO of

“Only one out of 10 consumers actually qualifies for 0 percent, and there are many factors that come into play,” warns Tony Le, pricing manager with There are typically two hurdles consumers who don’t want to pay interest on a car loan have to overcome.

High scores pay off

The first is the high credit score that is often required.

According to Experian Automotive, the average credit score of borrowers who secured interest rates of 1 percent or less on their auto loans in the first quarter of 2014 was 748. (The scoring model used was VantageScore 3.0, which goes up to 850.) Only 8 percent of borrowers qualified for loans with rates of 1 percent or less, says Melinda Zabritski, senior director of automotive credit for Experian Automotive.

A car payment or a mortgage payment?

The other big hurdle? The monthly payment.

The average vehicle loan term is now 66 months, according to Experian, and the average amount financed is close to $30,000 ($27,612, to be exact). But some interest-free offers extend only to a 36-month loan. For a $30,000 loan, that would mean a monthly payment of $833 a month. “That’s the catch,” says Le.

It’s not always the case that you have to take a short-term loan, however. Some manufacturers offer 60- or even 72-month financing with no interest.

“When you are negotiating, are you negotiating rate, or are you negotiating payment?” asks Zabritski. “If you are going to try to get a lower payment, [no-interest financing] might not be available on longer-term loans.”

One more potential pitfall: You may forgo the cash-back rebate in order to secure that rock-bottom rate, Le warns. offers a calculator that compares APR with the rebate to figure out which is the better deal.

The best of both worlds

Even if you don’t qualify for a 0 percent loan, you may be able to get a low interest rate on a longer-term loan that fits your budget. Here’s what kind of rates consumers pay, on average, in different credit score ranges.

Auto Loan Financing

As you can see from the table, while the difference between the average monthly payment consumers with poor credit are paying versus those who have excellent credit is only $35 a month, over the life of the loan, it adds up to $2,485 — and that is a lot!

While there are consumers who get loans at 0 percent today, “anything between 2 percent and 3.5 percent is good rate,” Zabritski advises.

If you’re not sure of your credit standing, you can check your credit score for free at Along with two scores, you’ll also get monthly updates and an action plan for your credit. The best time to check it is before you need to buy or replace your vehicle, since fixing mistakes or improving your credit can take time.

Graphic source: Experian Automotive, average loan terms for the first quarter 2014

More on

Stacy Johnson

It's not the usual blah, blah, blah

I know... every site you visit wants you to subscribe to their newsletter. But our news and advice is actually worth reading! For 25 years, I've been making people richer without making their eyes glaze over. You'll be glad you did. I guarantee it!


Read Next: 9 Tips to Ensure You’ll Have Enough to Retire

Check Out Our Hottest Deals!

We're always adding new deals and coupons that'll save you big bucks. See the deals to the right and hundreds more in our Deals section.

Click here to explore 1,675 more deals!