Consumer Alert: Check Your Mangoes

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The federal government says to avoid mangoes from a Mexican producer because they may contain Salmonella.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration warned Friday about bad mangoes. We’ve bolded the highlights…

  • The FDA is warning consumers against eating mangoes from Agricola Daniella, a mango supplier with multiple plantations and a single packing house located in Sinaloa, Mexico. Testing by the FDA has found Salmonella in mangoes from this producer.
  • The FDA has placed Agricola Daniella on Import Alert. This means that Agricola Daniella mangoes will be denied admission into the United States unless the importer shows they are not contaminated with Salmonella, such as by using private laboratories to test the mangoes.
  • Consumers should not eat Daniella brand mangoes. If consumers have recently purchased Daniella brand mangoes they should throw them away. These mangoes should be identified by product stickers. For mangoes without stickers, consumers should ask their retailer for brand information. When in doubt, throw it out.
  • Consumers should wash their hands with soap and warm water after handling these mangoes to remove any harmful bacteria that may have transferred to their hands.
  • If consumers believe they have mangoes from this producer, they should not try to wash the harmful bacteria off the mangoes as contamination may be both on the inside and outside of the fruit. Cutting, slicing and dicing may also transfer harmful bacteria from the fruit’s surface to the fruit’s flesh.
  • The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has reported an outbreak of Salmonella Braenderup, which has infected 105 people in 16 states. The California Department of Public Health has traced several illnesses of the outbreak strain of Salmonella Braenderup through the supply chain to Agricola Daniella.

The FDA adds that most people infected by Salmonella will “develop diarrhea, fever, and abdominal cramps 12 hours to 72 hours after infection. The illness usually lasts four days to seven days, and most people recover without treatment.” Children and the elderly have the most severe reactions, with approximately 400 people a year dying from it.

Stacy Johnson

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