Cruise Lines Reveal Crimes Reported Onboard

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It’s traditionally been hard to figure out how frequent crimes are on cruise ships. Now, cruise lines are starting to open up about reported incidents.

“Before Thursday, people only had access to U.S. Coast Guard crime figures that were based solely on cases in which the FBI had concluded an investigation,” The Associated Press says. That figure, for incidents between 2011 and the first half of this year, was 44, the Miami Herald says.

The real number is more than five times higher. There were 237 alleged serious crimes in the past 2 1/2 years, the Herald says, citing new data released by major cruise lines. The reports fall into these categories:

  • Sexual assault.
  • Theft greater than $10,000.
  • Tampering with the vessel.
  • Assault with serious injuries.
  • Kidnapping.
  • Suspicious death or homicide.

Norwegian Cruise Line reported 20 alleged crimes between October 2010 and June of this year, the South Florida Business Journal says. Royal Carribean reported 91 for that period, while Carnival’s four brands averaged a total of 41 reported crimes per year, the paper says.

The companies’ decision to disclose the information came after U.S. Sen. Jay Rockefeller, D-W.Va., introduced legislation that would force them to anyway, the Herald says.

The cruise companies emphasize these are incidents reported by passengers or crew, and don’t always turn out to be crimes. “The majority of these — more than 50 percent — are not substantiated as actual crimes after the initial investigation,” a Carnival spokesman told the Business Journal. “They are a fraction of the millions of passengers who sailed with us.”

You can look at the specific reported crimes at the following links:

Crime reports aren’t the only thing you should check before booking a cruise. Check out the video below and learn what else you should know:

Does this extra transparency make you feel better about taking a cruise? Let us know what you think on our Facebook page.

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  • KV Fabian

    Talking about crime on cruises. I will tell you what happened when I was a small child. We were enjoying the music in the cabaret. So we leave the show singing. We meet a couple of really nice ladies who know a place to sing more. They take us downstairs Now at a certain point the boat stops being a tourist place and becomes a residence for staff. The minute we step into the crews quarters the ladies say that we are stowaways: my parents are killed, our possessions taken and the ladies send people to our home back in our country. The problem? Some staff’s job are to mingle pleasantly with the tourists. So how do you set limits. how do you know when the cordial hospitality staff becomes pirates. And yourself separated from your cabin and identity.
    K.V.