For the First Time in 5 Years, U.S. Household Income Didn’t Decline

What's Hot


The Most Sinful City in the U.S. Is … (Hint: It’s Not Vegas)Family

How a Mexican Tariff Will Boost the Cost of 6 Common PurchasesFamily

This Free Software Brings Old Laptops Back to LifeMore

How to Protect Yourself From the ‘Can You Hear Me?’ Phone ScamFamily

Report: Walmart to Begin Selling CarsCars

Is Your TV Tracking You? Here’s How to Tell — and Prevent ItAround The House

Trump Scraps FHA Rate Cut — What Does It Mean for You?Borrow

Where to Sell Your Stuff for Top DollarAround The House

11 Staging Tips to Help You Get Top Dollar When Selling Your HomeAround The House

8 Tuition-Free U.S. CollegesCollege

10 Overlooked Expenses That Ruin Your BudgetFamily

4 Car Insurers That Might Raise Rates Even When the Accident Wasn’t Your FaultCars

How to Invest If Trump Kills the ‘Fiduciary Rule’Grow

20 Simple Hacks to Make Your Stuff Last LongerAround The House

12 Surprising Ways to Wreck Your Credit ScoreBorrow

The economic slide for many U.S. families appears to have stopped. Good news, but how about a turnaround? We're kind of stuck in neutral.

While the wealthiest Americans can celebrate the fact they’ve regained everything lost to the recession, the rest of us will have to find cheer in the fact we’re at least not getting poorer.

A new Census Bureau report shows that the poverty rate and median household income didn’t worsen last year. It was the first time in half a decade, The New York Times says.

That’s not to say things are great. About 46.5 million Americans are still in poverty, the report says, and the number of seniors in poverty rose. Inflation-adjusted median household income is $51,017.

“That is down about 9 percent from an inflation-adjusted peak of $56,080 in 1999, though the economy has grown by about 28 percent since then,” the Times says. “Income is also down about 8.3 percent since 2007, when the economy started to contract.”

There are a couple of bright spots in the report. Slightly fewer people are going without health insurance. About 3 million more people had coverage last year than in 2011. The number of men working full time and year-round also increased by about 1 million. (“The change for women was not statistically significant,” the report says.)

Most other measures were little changed from the previous year. We’re kind of stuck in neutral.

“Everything’s on hold, but at a bad level,” Ron Haskins of the Brookings Institution told the Times. “Don’t expect things to change until the American economy begins to generate more jobs.”

Stacy Johnson

It's not the usual blah, blah, blah

I know... every site you visit wants you to subscribe to their newsletter. But our news and advice is actually worth reading! For 25 years, I've been making people richer without making their eyes glaze over. You'll be glad you did. I guarantee it!

💰🗣📰

Read Next: 21 Restaurants Offering Free Food Right Now

Check Out Our Hottest Deals!

We're always adding new deals and coupons that'll save you big bucks. See the deals to the right and hundreds more in our Deals section.

Click here to explore 1,824 more deals!