Health Care Without Insurance – $50/Month?

By on

You’ve probably heard of Doctors Without Borders. Now get ready for doctors without insurance.

Thanks to a little-known provision of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, otherwise known as healthcare reform, beginning in 2014, a new type of medical practice will be allowed to compete within state-based insurance exchanges. They’re called Direct Primary Care practices, or “medical homes.” As you saw in the video above, by eliminating insurance companies from the health care equation, these practices promise to lower the cost of medical care by up to 40 percent – according to some experts, the amount sucked up by insurance company profit and overhead.

The way it works

Rather than paying an insurance company every month for health coverage, you cut out them out entirely and pay a doctor or group directly. It’s like a gym membership – you pay every month whether you go or not, but you can go as often as you want, whenever you want. No insurance, no deductible, no paperwork, no bill. The cost? $50 – $150 per month, depending on your age.

And not only is this idea a money-saver, its proponents claim that it could also radically improve the quality of care you receive, because the doctors will be able to spend time with patients that’s now spent on paperwork.

How can the simple act of eliminating an insurance company offer both lower costs and better care? To get an idea, consider your car insurance. Suppose that whenever you needed an oil change, an insurance company was going to pay the bill. You don’t care how much an oil change costs – that’s the insurance company’s problem. But because they’re paying, the insurance company only allows you to see a mechanic with whom it has negotiated rates and otherwise approved in advance. When you go to the shop, the mechanic has to keep detailed records of exactly what was done to your car and why. In order to get paid for their services, the mechanic will have to submit the proper forms – different for each insurance company they work with – then await approval. If the insurance company reviews the file and decides your car didn’t really need an oil change, the mechanic provided services that may not have been necessary, or there’s a deductible in your policy, they’ll disallow the payment. The mechanic will then be forced to start over and collect their money from you.

Result? Your mechanic is going to spend a lot more time adhering to insurance company guidelines, filling out paperwork, and trying to collect their money – and a lot less time changing oil. Since they don’t get paid for doing paperwork, they’ll have to work longer hours, charge more, and/or spend less time with your car. In addition, they may find their job less rewarding, since rather than doing what they think is right, they’ll instead be doing only what an insurance company mandates.

The reason you don’t have insurance for things like oil changes is that you don’t need it. An oil change isn’t a big enough expense to justify the added hassle, overhead and paperwork of working through an insurance company. Proponents of direct primary care offer the same logic for doctor visits. Forget the insurance – just pay a monthly fee and go see a happier doctor as often as you want. And that’s where 90 percent of health care happens: in a doctor’s office.

But what about the other 10 percent of healthcare that happens at a specialist’s office, an emergency room or in a hospital? For potentially catastrophic costs, you’ll still need insurance – just like you do for your car. So in addition to joining a direct primary care group, you’ll still need insurance to cover hospital visits. But since that’s all that’s covered, it’s theoretically much less expensive.

Direct primary care isn’t for everyone. For example, if you never go to the doctor, maybe you’d prefer to just get a high-deductible policy and skip the $50-$100 month cost of a direct primary care practice. There will also be people (or employers) to whom even $50 a month per person is unaffordable. But this type of innovation could be a partial solution for some employers, as well as the millions who now pay for their own insurance.

If you’d like to see what this kind of health care solution looks like, you don’t have to wait. As you saw in the video above, they exist right now. The company we featured, Qliance, is in the Seattle area. But here’s a nationwide list of direct primary care doctors. And here’s a website that has a lot more information on the concept.

Sign up for our free newsletter

Like this article? Sign up for our newsletter and we'll send you a regular digest of our newest stories, full of money saving tips and advice, free! We'll also email you a PDF of Stacy Johnson's "205 Ways to Save Money" as soon as you've subscribed. It's full of great tips that'll help you save a ton of extra cash. It doesn't cost a dime, so why wait? Click here to sign up now.

Check out our hottest deals!

We're always adding new deals and coupons that'll save you big bucks. See the deals to the right and hundreds more in our Deals section.

Click here to explore 1,282 more deals!

Comments & discussion

We welcome your opinions, but let’s keep it civil. Like many businesses, we reserve the right to refuse service to anyone. In our case, that means those who communicate by name-calling, racism, using words designed to hurt others or generally acting like an uninformed bully. Also, comments that include links to email addresses or commercial websites typically aren't posted. This isn't a place to advertise your business.

  • Anonymous

    One problem we have with the “Doctors Without Insurance” program is that many of our primary care physicians are acquiring Specialists certification where they are able to command more money due to the limitations that Medicare and other insurance companies impose.

  • http://twitter.com/davisliumd davisliumd

    Concierge medicine is hardly a new idea and has been around since 1996. The real question is if there is any evidence that the care they provide is better in terms of adherence to guidelines developed by medical experts. It is reasonable to assume more face time equals better care, but without actual research or evidence to demonstrate that to be the case, it really is buyer beware.


    Davis Liu, MD
    Author of Stay Healthy, Live Longer, Spend Wisely: Making Intelligent Choices in America’s Healthcare System
    (available in hardcover, Kindle, and iPad / iBooks)
    Website: http://www.davisliumd.com
    Blog: http://www.davisliumd.blogspot.com
    Twitter: davisliumd

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_HVLZL3LZTVYYRCWNXB3ALPCB5U CherylG

    Please post a list or link telling us how to locate this type of provider currently practicing in our specific areas/states!!! My family could greatly benefit from this!!

    • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_KVFC7M6KURYCPQTR7GVSN2TGJI echo

      The link is below.

      http://www.dpcare.org/practices

      To my surprised it is not $50-$100 per month like it said in the video but a $240 a month here in California for 1 doctor plus you still to have your own insurance to pay for some test if needed.

  • Anonymous

    My state (Idaho) has no doctors on this list. How can I encourage my doctor/health care provider to look into this?

  • James Lill

    Genius Plan! Doctors will love getting paid $50 dollars for procedures that can cost tens of thousands. I surprised more doctors don’t do this. It may be because they are not idiots.