Latest Trend in Housing: ‘Snore Rooms’

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Can't sleep with all that wood-sawing racket? One solution is to move the offender to a specially designed sleeping room.

Some home builders are politely calling them “dual master suites,” but another name gets to the point — “snore rooms.”

There are many reasons why people snore. Extra weight, pregnancy, allergies and certain medications can all cause it, the National Institutes of Health say. Sometimes it’s a sign of something worse, like sleep apnea, and sometimes not. Either way, snoring tends to become more common as we age and lose muscle tone.

“Snoring is an important social problem,” the agency says. “People who share a bed with someone who snores can develop sleep difficulties.” Some home builders agree, and they’re building solutions.

Snore rooms are often designed as dens connected to the bathroom or dressing area of the master bedroom, an architect told MarketWatch. They’re becoming a selling point in some communities built for the 55-and-older crowd. In existing homes, a former kids’ room or a guest bedroom is easily converted into a snorer’s refuge.

Several people who own homes with snore rooms — although they may not use them for that purpose — declined to be interviewed for MarketWatch’s story. But stats suggest a lot of couples sleep separately.

“For one reason or another, 18 percent of Americans who are married, partnered or living together don’t sleep with their significant other, according to the 2013 International Bedroom Poll from the National Sleep Foundation,” MarketWatch says. For some, it might be due to theft of the covers or a habit of rolling around, but for others it’s definitely snoring.

What do you think of snore rooms? Comment below or on our Facebook page.

Stacy Johnson

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