Millionaires Collected Unemployment During Recession

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Unemployment benefits aren’t just for the working class, Bloomberg reports:

The 2,362 people in millionaire homes represent 0.02 percent of the 11.3 million U.S. tax filers who reported unemployment insurance income in 2009, according to the August report. Another 954,000 households earning more than $100,000 during the worst economic downturn since the Great Depression also reported receiving unemployment benefits.

Those numbers come from a new Congressional research report, which notes eliminating those benefits for millionaires would save $20 million over 10 years. “1.1 million people exhausted their jobless benefits during the second quarter of 2012,” Bloomberg adds.

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  • Melanie Kofoed

    The only way they can LEGALLY collect Unemployment is if they are ACTIVELY applying for 2 jobs per week. This is time consuming and I doubt that a millionaire would find it was a profitable use of time to keep records of every job they apply for, who they spoke to, and the results of the application for an average of $200 before taxes, in benefits per week. Perhaps it is time for their case workers to start auditing their claims.