How To: Find Financial Help

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How can I lower my debt? How can I increase my savings? Wouldn't it be nice to know who to ask?

If you resolved to get your financial house in order this year, then you’re probably going to encounter some questions and problems along the way. If so, where will you turn for help?

Patrica Packwood knows firsthand what it’s like to be a victim of identity theft…

“Somethings not right here, I called Capital and said I just tried to use my credit card and it wouldn’t go through.”
-Patricia Packwood

Seems simple enough, but after dozens of calls and letters, her bank refused to take the $1,700 of fraudulent charges off her statement. So as a last resort, she turned to a Consumer Credit Counseling Service.

“I said the first thing you need is to call the Federal Trade Commission, the Better Business Bureau, re-contact again all 3 credit reporting agencies letting them know the situation, also resend the copies back to the lender advising them of what you’ve done”
-Judy Damian, Consumer Credit Counseling Service

“She put me at ease right away, she took quite a lot of pressure off me just talking to her… Capital One eventually wrote me a letter, gave me credit for everything and said all was cleared up.”
-Patricia Packwood

Most of us think of credit counselors as people you turn to when you’re drowning in debt, and that’s true, but they can also help with simple advice on practically anything from saving more to building a budget to identity theft.

Bottom line? Obviously if you’ve got a major problem going to a place like consumer credit is a great idea, but what you might not know is whatever your questions are, whatever you need help with, try them first. They’re free, they’re helpful.

Stacy Johnson

It's not the usual blah, blah, blah

I know... every site you visit wants you to subscribe to their newsletter. But our news and advice is actually worth reading! For 25 years, I've been making people richer without making their eyes glaze over. You'll be glad you did. I guarantee it!

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