City’s New Tax Causes Soda Consumption to Plunge

What's Hot


The Most Sinful City in the U.S. Is … (Hint: It’s Not Vegas)Family

How a Mexican Tariff Will Boost the Cost of 6 Common PurchasesFamily

This Free Software Brings Old Laptops Back to LifeMore

How to Protect Yourself From the ‘Can You Hear Me?’ Phone ScamFamily

Report: Walmart to Begin Selling CarsCars

Is Your TV Tracking You? Here’s How to Tell — and Prevent ItAround The House

Trump Scraps FHA Rate Cut — What Does It Mean for You?Borrow

Where to Sell Your Stuff for Top DollarAround The House

11 Staging Tips to Help You Get Top Dollar When Selling Your HomeAround The House

8 Tuition-Free U.S. CollegesCollege

10 Overlooked Expenses That Ruin Your BudgetFamily

4 Car Insurers That Might Raise Rates Even When the Accident Wasn’t Your FaultCars

How to Invest If Trump Kills the ‘Fiduciary Rule’Grow

20 Simple Hacks to Make Your Stuff Last LongerAround The House

12 Surprising Ways to Wreck Your Credit ScoreBorrow

Find out what triggered the change in drinking habits in one city -- and what it could mean for public health.

Berkeley, California, is winning the so-called fight against big soda.

It’s been nearly two years since 3 out of 4 Berkeley voters approved a 1-cent-an-ounce tax on soda and other sugary drinks. The “soda tax,” which was implemented in March 2015, is now being credited with a significant drop in the consumption of sugary drinks in that city.

According to a new study published in the American Journal of Public Health, lower-income Berkeley residents reduced their sugar-sweetened beverage consumption by a whopping 21 percent in the first five months after the tax was put into effect.

Instead of swigging soda and sports drinks, these Berkeley residents increased their water consumption by 63 percent, says the Los Angeles Times.

Although other municipalities across the U.S. have considered taxing sugary drinks, Berkeley was the first city in the nation to endorse a soda tax. Philadelphia followed suit in June, when its City Council approved a 1.5 cent-per-ounce tax that will go into effect Jan. 1, 2017.

San Francisco had a similar measure on its ballot in November 2014, when residents in Berkeley, just across San Francisco Bay, passed their city’s soda tax. But the San Francisco initiative failed to pass.

Kristine Madsen, a researcher at the University of California, Berkeley’s School of Public Health and senior author of the study, tells NPR the juxtaposition of Berkeley and San Francisco provided a “perfect natural experiment.”

San Franciscans and Berkeley residents reported drinking similar amounts of sugary drinks before they voted on the tax. But since the soda tax was implemented in Berkeley, soda consumption in San Francisco and neighboring Oakland actually increased by 4 percent, says the Times’ report on the study.

Madsen says reducing sugar-sweetened beverage consumption by 21 percent is enough to lower the rates of obesity and Type 2 diabetes for many years to come.

“This would have a huge public health impact if it were sustained,” she tells NPR.

What do you think about a soda tax? Would it impact your decision to purchase a soda or other sugary beverage? Share your comments below or on our Facebook page.

Stacy Johnson

It's not the usual blah, blah, blah

I know... every site you visit wants you to subscribe to their newsletter. But our news and advice is actually worth reading! For 25 years, I've been making people richer without making their eyes glaze over. You'll be glad you did. I guarantee it!

💰🗣📰

Read Next: 8 Ways to Get Your FICO Score for Free

Check Out Our Hottest Deals!

We're always adding new deals and coupons that'll save you big bucks. See the deals to the right and hundreds more in our Deals section.

Click here to explore 1,790 more deals!