Study: Major Midlife Stresses Tied to Dementia Risk

What's Hot


How to Cut the Cable TV Cord in 2017Family

8 Major Freebies and Discounts You Get With Amazon PrimeSave

Study: People Who Curse Are More HonestFamily

8 Creative Ways to Clear ClutterAround The House

15 Things You Should Always Buy at a Dollar StoreMore

Pay $2 and Get Unlimited Wendy’s Frosty Treats in 2017Family

5 Reasons to Shop for a Home in DecemberFamily

This Free Software Brings Old Laptops Back to LifeMore

Should You Donate to Wreaths Across America? A Lesson in Charitable GivingAround The House

6 Reasons Why Savers Are Sexier Than SpendersCredit & Debt

Resolutions 2017: Save More Money Using 5 Simple TricksCredit & Debt

10 Free Things That Used to Cost MoneyAround The House

7 New Year’s Resolutions to Make With Your KidsFamily

10 Simple Money Moves to Make Before the New YearFamily

The 3 Golden Rules of Lending to Friends and FamilyBorrow

A nearly 40-year study on hundreds of women suggests that stressful events such as divorce and work problems may increase the risk of dementia.

Common stresses in our lives may contribute to dementia, a long-term study published in the medical journal BMJ Open suggests.

The study was conducted over nearly 40 years on 800 Swedish women, beginning in 1968 when participants were between ages 38 to 54. “A psychiatrist examined the women and rated several common stressors, including divorce, illness in loved ones, problems with their own or their husbands’ work, or having a limited social network,” The Atlantic says.

Researchers followed up with the women at points throughout their lives — in 1974, 1980, 1992, 2000 and 2005. “At each follow-up visit, researchers documented how many symptoms of distress — irritability, fear or sleep disturbances — each woman had experienced in the preceding five years,” MedicalNewsToday.com says.

By the end of the follow-ups, 153 of the women had developed dementia, the study says. On average, it was diagnosed at age 78. Of the 153, a total of 104 had Alzheimer’s.

The number of stress factors present in 1968 was associated with a higher incidence of dementia, as well as with more future stress. “The number of stressors the women reported in 1968 was associated with a 21 percent increased risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease and a 15 percent increased risk of developing any kind of dementia,” MedicalNewsToday.com says.

Future research could further define the relationship between stress and dementia, see whether stress management and therapy could reduce the risk, and check for similar findings in men. For now, it’s at least obvious that we want to minimize stress.

“Current evidence suggests the best ways to reduce the risk of dementia are to eat a balanced diet, take regular exercise, not smoke, and keep blood pressure and cholesterol in check,” Dr. Simon Ridley, of Alzheimer’s Research UK, told the BBC.

Stacy Johnson

It's not the usual blah, blah, blah

I know... every site you visit wants you to subscribe to their newsletter. But our news and advice is actually worth reading! For 25 years, I've been making people richer without making their eyes glaze over. You'll be glad you did. I guarantee it!

💰🗣📰

Read Next: 10 Overlooked Expenses That Ruin Your Budget

Check Out Our Hottest Deals!

We're always adding new deals and coupons that'll save you big bucks. See the deals to the right and hundreds more in our Deals section.

Click here to explore 1,848 more deals!