The Scary Way a Friend Request Can Lead to Identity Theft

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This post comes from Patricia Oliver at partner site Credit.com.

As millions of users log in to Facebook every day and send requests to join others’ social media networks, there are some friends who will quickly turn out to be enemies. A growing trend among cybercriminals is called farcing, when strangers send friend requests on social media to steal information for fraud or identity theft.

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Cybercriminals are exploiting the popularity of social media sites to worm themselves into inner social circles. Once a cybercriminal has managed to gain access to an individual’s network of friends and family, he or she can then become friends with others to pilfer their information, according to a study by the University of Buffalo.

With the personal information social media users put out on their profiles and in status updates, identity thieves could collect this data for fraudulent purpose while disguising themselves as legitimate users.

Arun Vishwanath, associate professor of communication at the University of Buffalo, conducted the study, which involved making fake Facebook profiles. He found that 1 in 5 social media users approved the fake friend requests.

One of the reasons social media users allowed them to be friends was because of their photos or list of contacts, because Facebook can show how many mutual friends users have. However, Vishwanath said those who fell for the ruse could be fooled because cybercriminals performing farcing attacks often scope out other victims from available friends’ lists.

Teens are especially vulnerable

The impact of these farcing attacks may become worse as users are increasingly sharing sensitive information, from where they work to where they live, with their friends.

Teens may be especially vulnerable to farcing attacks, because they may not protect their information as seriously as other users, according to a study by the Pew Research Internet Project.

The Pew study showed that teens are sharing more information about themselves on their social media networks compared with past years. More than 7 in 10 teens said they listed their school name, and 53 percent said they posted their email address. In addition to posting these private details, 82 percent said they made their date of birth available, which is one key piece of information that could be exploited by identity thieves.

As oversharing becomes a problem on social media sites, Vishwanath warns users to be careful about who they allow to join their circle of friends.

Protecting the personal information you share online is vital to keeping your identity safe. An identity thief can use your information to open new accounts in your name, which can do massive damage to your credit.

Your best line of defense is to monitor your financial accounts regularly. It’s smart to pull your credit reports often (you can get one free annual report from each of the three major credit bureaus). Also, you can check two of your credit scores for free every month on Credit.com. Any large, unexpected change in your credit scores could signal identity theft, and you should pull your credit reports to confirm.

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  • grandmaguest

    While far from being a teen….I have on several occasions received requests from “friends of friends” which I always politely decline by telling them that I do not friend someone I do not personally know. For me facebook is ONLY to keep up with MY actual friends and family. Especially those who live a distance away.
    I never could figure out the people (especially some of the younger people who have hundreds if not thousands of “friends”……really??? do you really even know (and know well) that many people not just casual aquaintances? I have a hard time following just the few dozen family members I’m “friends” with. No wonder these young people spend hours and hours a day on these sites.