The TSA Has $531,000 in Our Loose Change It Doesn’t Know What to Do With

What's Hot


How to Cut the Cable TV Cord in 2017Family

8 Major Freebies and Discounts You Get With Amazon PrimeSave

Study: People Who Curse Are More HonestFamily

8 Creative Ways to Clear ClutterAround The House

15 Things You Should Always Buy at a Dollar StoreMore

Pay $2 and Get Unlimited Wendy’s Frosty Treats in 2017Family

5 Reasons to Shop for a Home in DecemberFamily

This Free Software Brings Old Laptops Back to LifeMore

Should You Donate to Wreaths Across America? A Lesson in Charitable GivingAround The House

6 Reasons Why Savers Are Sexier Than SpendersCredit & Debt

Resolutions 2017: Save More Money Using 5 Simple TricksCredit & Debt

10 Free Things That Used to Cost MoneyAround The House

7 New Year’s Resolutions to Make With Your KidsFamily

10 Simple Money Moves to Make Before the New YearFamily

The 3 Golden Rules of Lending to Friends and FamilyBorrow

People leave tens of thousands of dollars in change at major airports every year. The TSA collects it, but hasn't spent much.

Now we know the real reason for those trays you put your stuff in at the security checkpoint at the airport: They’re coin traps.

The Transportation Security Administration says it collected $531,000 in loose change left behind at security checkpoints in the 2012 fiscal year, Travel and Leisure says. It’s sitting mostly untapped in an aviation security fund, but one proposal in Congress could put it to use.

The TSA Loose Change Act, proposed by Rep. Jeff Miller, R-Fla., would rewrite federal law so that change left behind would automatically be transferred to nonprofits such as the USO, Bloomberg Businessweek says. They would use the money to install airport lounges for traveling military service members, their families and veterans.

Sounds great in theory. In practice, though, it may end up costing more money than is taken in. When Miller tried to pass a similar bill in 2011, the Congressional Budget Office estimated it would cost $1.2 million to collect, account for and transfer all those coins, The Washington Post says.

Regardless, this time the bill is getting support — it already passed the House and is headed to the Senate.

By the way, curious about which airports had the most money left behind? Businessweek has a list. Here are the cities where people were most forgetful:

  • Miami — $39,613.
  • Las Vegas — $26,900.
  • Chicago — $22,115.
  • Los Angeles — $21,916.
  • New York City — $21,201.
  • Dallas — $21,090.
  • San Francisco — $19,873.
  • Boston — $16,405.
  • Houston — $16,000.
  • Washington, D.C. — $16,000.
Stacy Johnson

It's not the usual blah, blah, blah

I know... every site you visit wants you to subscribe to their newsletter. But our news and advice is actually worth reading! For 25 years, I've been making people richer without making their eyes glaze over. You'll be glad you did. I guarantee it!

💰🗣📰

Read Next: Beware These 10 Common and Costly Tax Mistakes

Check Out Our Hottest Deals!

We're always adding new deals and coupons that'll save you big bucks. See the deals to the right and hundreds more in our Deals section.

Click here to explore 1,839 more deals!