Which Appliances Are Most Likely To Cause a Fire?

What's Hot

Do This or Your iPhone Bill May SkyrocketSave

23 Upgrades Under $50 to Make Your House Look AwesomeAround The House

Trump Worth $10 Billion Less Than If He’d Simply Invested in Index FundsBusiness

11 Places in the World Where You Can Afford to Retire in StyleMore

What You Need to Know for 2017 Obamacare EnrollmentFamily

8 Things Rich People Buy That Make Them Look DumbAround The House

32 of the Highest-Paid American SpeakersMake

Amazon Prime No Longer Pledges Free 2-Day Shipping on All ItemsMore

More Caffeine Means Less Dementia for WomenFamily

9 Tips to Ensure You’ll Have Enough to RetireFamily

5 DIY Ways to Make Your Car Smell GreatCars

30 Awesome Things to Do in RetirementCollege

5 Spots Where Retirees Can Live for Less Than $40,000Real Estate

10 Ways to Pull Together the Down Payment for a HomeCredit & Debt

10 Ways to Reduce Your Homeowner’s Insurance RatesFamily

50 Ways to Make a Fast $50 (or Lots More)Grow

Don't let home appliances put your family and belongings at risk. Learn which are the most dangerous and how to stay safe.

Appliances were the main cause of 69,000 fires between 2002 and 2009, according to the U.S. Fire Administration.

ShopSmart magazine’s newest issue analyzed the agency’s statistics and found that about half of them were caused by a mechanical, electrical or design flaw. I guess we can chalk the rest up to poor safety practices.

Here are the three most dangerous devices and how to avoid related fires:

  • Ranges. A total of 16,824 stove fires were reported over the study period, almost twice as many as for any other appliance. The main causes were burners that turned themselves on and delayed ignition on a gas oven’s bake and broil functions. Watch digital displays for error messages, keep flammable items and children away from the cooking area, and don’t leave the range unattended when it’s on.
  • Clothes dryers. Lint buildup and gas leaks involving gas-powered dryers were the main causes for 8,717 fires. Always remember to empty the lint trap and annually check vents for clogging. For gas dryers, install a carbon monoxide alarm nearby.
  • Microwaves. Self-starting units and shattered glass doors contributed to 1,705 fires. Some microwaves displayed the codes “PAN” or “F2” when self-starting, ShopSmart says. Don’t leave anything in the microwave when it’s not in use, and know which circuit breaker controls the appliance’s power in case you lose control of it.

More than 3,400 Americans die each year in fires and about 17,500 are injured, the U.S. Fire Administration says. Make sure you have working smoke alarms, and check out the National Fire Protection Association website for more fire safety tips.

Stacy Johnson

It's not the usual blah, blah, blah

I know... every site you visit wants you to subscribe to their newsletter. But our news and advice is actually worth reading! For 25 years, I've been making people richer without making their eyes glaze over. You'll be glad you did. I guarantee it!


Read Next: Taco Bell Is Handing Out Free Food for World Series Stolen Bases

Check Out Our Hottest Deals!

We're always adding new deals and coupons that'll save you big bucks. See the deals to the right and hundreds more in our Deals section.

Click here to explore 1,675 more deals!