Your Smartphone Might Cause a Wreck

What's Hot


How to Cut the Cable TV Cord in 2017Family

8 Major Freebies and Discounts You Get With Amazon PrimeSave

8 Creative Ways to Clear ClutterAround The House

Study: People Who Curse Are More HonestFamily

This Free Software Brings Old Laptops Back to LifeMore

Pay $2 and Get Unlimited Wendy’s Frosty Treats in 2017Family

The 3 Golden Rules of Lending to Friends and FamilyBorrow

6 Reasons Why Savers Are Sexier Than SpendersCredit & Debt

Resolutions 2017: Save More Money Using 5 Simple TricksCredit & Debt

Porta-Potties for Presidential Inauguration Cause a StinkFamily

Protecting Trump Will Cost Taxpayers $35 MillionFamily

7 New Year’s Resolutions to Make With Your KidsFamily

5 New Year’s Resolutions That Will Pay Off 10 Years From NowCollege

10 Tasty Alcohol-Free Drinks That Adults Will LoveFamily

10 Simple Money Moves to Make Before the New YearFamily

Could Your Pet Benefit From Marijuana-Laced Treats?Family

Not from texting: Because of poor government planning in the quest for smarter cars.

Wired writes the federal government has been working with automakers and safety groups on a wireless system that could eventually prevent car crashes.

The only problem: in a case of one hand not knowing what the other’s doing, the FCC is planning to make the wireless frequency destined for smarter cars for other Wi-Fi use instead. Their plan was to use it so the Internet will run more smoothly on congested network connections, such as airports, convention centers, and other public spaces.

The Intelligent Transportation Society of America (ITSA) is protesting the move, along with automakers, AAA, and many state departments of transportation. It was ITSA that convinced the FCC to set aside wireless spectrum for vehicle-to-vehicle communications in the first place, more than 10 years ago when far fewer people made use of wireless connections.

Another federal agency, the National Highway Transportation Safety Administration, is testing how a wirelessly connected car system would work. They’re using 3,000 vehicles to assess what the system would mean for traffic, infrastructure, and safety. The results could decide whether cars will soon adopt the technology.

ITSA president and CEO Scott Belcher told Wired, ““We’re talking about technology that can help reduce non-impaired vehicles crashes by over 80 percent. Do you really want to put that kind of safety at risk for unlicensed Wi-Fi applications? The answer has to be no.”

Stacy Johnson

It's not the usual blah, blah, blah

I know... every site you visit wants you to subscribe to their newsletter. But our news and advice is actually worth reading! For 25 years, I've been making people richer without making their eyes glaze over. You'll be glad you did. I guarantee it!

💰🗣📰

Read Next: 8 Ways to Bolster Your Finances in the Trump Era

Check Out Our Hottest Deals!

We're always adding new deals and coupons that'll save you big bucks. See the deals to the right and hundreds more in our Deals section.

Click here to explore 1,882 more deals!