Your Smartphone Might Cause a Wreck

What's Hot

23 Upgrades Under $50 to Make Your House Look AwesomeAround The House

Trump Worth $10 Billion Less Than If He’d Simply Invested in Index FundsBusiness

Do This or Your iPhone Bill May SkyrocketSave

11 Places in the World Where You Can Afford to Retire in StyleMore

19 Moves That Will Help You Retire Early and in StyleFamily

What You Need to Know for 2017 Obamacare EnrollmentFamily

8 Things Rich People Buy That Make Them Look DumbAround The House

50 Ways to Make a Fast $50 (or Lots More)Grow

32 of the Highest-Paid American SpeakersMake

The 35 Two-Year Colleges That Produce the Highest EarnersCollege

5 DIY Ways to Make Your Car Smell GreatCars

Amazon Prime No Longer Pledges Free 2-Day Shipping on All ItemsMore

More Caffeine Means Less Dementia for WomenFamily

7 Household Hacks That Save You CashAround The House

5 Reasons a Roth IRA Should Be Part of Your Retirement PlanGrow

30 Awesome Things to Do in RetirementCollege

Beware These 10 Retail Sales Tricks That Get You to Spend MoreMore

9 Tips to Ensure You’ll Have Enough to RetireFamily

Not from texting: Because of poor government planning in the quest for smarter cars.

Wired writes the federal government has been working with automakers and safety groups on a wireless system that could eventually prevent car crashes.

The only problem: in a case of one hand not knowing what the other’s doing, the FCC is planning to make the wireless frequency destined for smarter cars for other Wi-Fi use instead. Their plan was to use it so the Internet will run more smoothly on congested network connections, such as airports, convention centers, and other public spaces.

The Intelligent Transportation Society of America (ITSA) is protesting the move, along with automakers, AAA, and many state departments of transportation. It was ITSA that convinced the FCC to set aside wireless spectrum for vehicle-to-vehicle communications in the first place, more than 10 years ago when far fewer people made use of wireless connections.

Another federal agency, the National Highway Transportation Safety Administration, is testing how a wirelessly connected car system would work. They’re using 3,000 vehicles to assess what the system would mean for traffic, infrastructure, and safety. The results could decide whether cars will soon adopt the technology.

ITSA president and CEO Scott Belcher told Wired, ““We’re talking about technology that can help reduce non-impaired vehicles crashes by over 80 percent. Do you really want to put that kind of safety at risk for unlicensed Wi-Fi applications? The answer has to be no.”

Stacy Johnson

It's not the usual blah, blah, blah

I know... every site you visit wants you to subscribe to their newsletter. But our news and advice is actually worth reading! For 25 years, I've been making people richer without making their eyes glaze over. You'll be glad you did. I guarantee it!


Read Next: Sam’s Club Reveals Details of Black Friday, 5 Other Holiday Sales

Check Out Our Hottest Deals!

We're always adding new deals and coupons that'll save you big bucks. See the deals to the right and hundreds more in our Deals section.

Click here to explore 1,709 more deals!