Obamacare a Saving Grace for Many Baby Boomers

By on

The seemingly never-ending pursuit of health insurance is finally over for a number of aging Americans who were left jobless during the recession.

As The Associated Press reports, the Affordable Care Act, commonly called Obamacare, has made a big impact on those “unwanted by employers, rejected by insurers, struggling to cover rising medical costs and praying to reach Medicare age before a health crisis.”

These people in their 50s and early 60s have been signing up in droves to buy health insurance through the state and federal online marketplaces, where they’ll find several tiers of plans and learn if they’re eligible for a federal tax credit to help them afford the premiums. Eligibility for the credit is based on income, and many likely will qualify, but you have to buy insurance through a marketplace to get it.

In fact, people ages 55 to 64 make up 31 percent of new Obamacare enrollees. The AP reports that after signing up for insurance, many people make doctors’ appointments and fill prescriptions – something many had avoided because they were uninsured.

“I just cried I was so relieved,” said Maureen Grey, a 58-year-old Chicagoan who finally saw a doctor this month after a fall in September left her in constant pain. Laid off twice from full-time jobs in the past five years, she saw her income drop from $60,000 to $17,800 a year. Now doing temp work, she was uninsured for 18 months before she chose a marketplace plan for $68 a month.

Open enrollment on the marketplaces continues through March 31.

According to the Star Tribune, Vice President Joe Biden told customers at a Minneapolis coffee shop Wednesday that health insurance enrollment will likely miss its target. “We may not get to 7 million, we may get to 5 or 6 [million], but that’s a hell of a start,” Biden said.

Sign up for our free newsletter

Like this article? Sign up for our newsletter and we'll send you a regular digest of our newest stories, full of money saving tips and advice, free! We'll also email you a PDF of Stacy Johnson's "205 Ways to Save Money" as soon as you've subscribed. It's full of great tips that'll help you save a ton of extra cash. It doesn't cost a dime, so why wait? Click here to sign up now.

Check out our hottest deals!

We're always adding new deals and coupons that'll save you big bucks. See the deals to the right and hundreds more in our Deals section.

Click here to explore 1,095 more deals!

Comments & discussion

We welcome your opinions, but let’s keep it civil. Like many businesses, we reserve the right to refuse service to anyone. In our case, that means those who communicate by name-calling, racism, using words designed to hurt others or generally acting like an uninformed bully. Also, comments that include links to email addresses or commercial websites typically aren't posted. This isn't a place to advertise your business.

  • Y2KJillian

    Washington State ACA offers plans in price ranges and deductible ranges that can be very affordable, deductibles as low as $100, I’ve seen, with monthly amounts as low as “0.” But WA state took the federal subsidies and worked the plan up the way it was intended to be used!
    We’ve been going over the site for two months now and realized with this available, we can afford to retire early, and are doing so. We’ll take COBRA (buying into your employer’s medical insurance plan after your employment ends) for the first 9 months, the rest of this year, but then will switch gladly to the Washingto State ACA come the new year.
    If you have ever priced private medical insurance you’d be relieved to see what the ACA through WA state offers, and if you have pre-existing conditions (we do), you’ll be doubly relieved.
    We were able to shop for plans that are accepted by our current doctor, whom we really like, and at our retirement rate of income it will be more affordable than COBRA, which lasts only 18 months anyway.
    We hope the Medicare system will be better by the time we reach 65; the doughnut hole looms a little at us since we do have those pre-existing conditions which require ongoing medication…but if the gentle move from greed among the medical insurers to national health care progresses as we hope it will, we should be fine.
    American is one of the only free republics on the planet that does not give national medical insurance to its citizens, which is a national disgrace. We are very glad to see at last that America is entering the modern world.
    My husband has rheumatoid arthritis and this is a real benefit to him and to us both.
    Jillian

  • Y2KJillian

    Thank you, guest. Appreciated hearing your adult, indoor voice!
    Jillian