ID Thieves Steal Woman’s Tax Refund 2 Years in a Row

What's Hot

23 Upgrades Under $50 to Make Your House Look AwesomeAround The House

Trump Worth $10 Billion Less Than If He’d Simply Invested in Index FundsBusiness

Do This or Your iPhone Bill May SkyrocketSave

11 Places in the World Where You Can Afford to Retire in StyleMore

19 Moves That Will Help You Retire Early and in StyleFamily

What You Need to Know for 2017 Obamacare EnrollmentFamily

8 Things Rich People Buy That Make Them Look DumbAround The House

50 Ways to Make a Fast $50 (or Lots More)Grow

32 of the Highest-Paid American SpeakersMake

The 35 Two-Year Colleges That Produce the Highest EarnersCollege

5 DIY Ways to Make Your Car Smell GreatCars

Amazon Prime No Longer Pledges Free 2-Day Shipping on All ItemsMore

More Caffeine Means Less Dementia for WomenFamily

7 Household Hacks That Save You CashAround The House

5 Reasons a Roth IRA Should Be Part of Your Retirement PlanGrow

30 Awesome Things to Do in RetirementCollege

Beware These 10 Retail Sales Tricks That Get You to Spend MoreMore

9 Tips to Ensure You’ll Have Enough to RetireFamily

Crooks were able to con the IRS into sending them a refund in her name even though there were special protections in place to keep it from happening again.

Imagine filing your federal tax return, only to find out someone already beat you to the punch – and claimed a tax refund in your name. Many thousands of Americans fall victim to this type of tax-related identity theft every year.

It’s happened to Atlanta resident Kenyatta Solomon for two years in a row, WSB-TV said. Even though Solomon had her account flagged with the IRS, as well as a special personal identification number she needed to file, an ID thief was still able to pocket a return by using her name and other personal information. According to WSB-TV:

“It’s very frustrating, especially when they say they have all these things in place and they’re supposed to be able to protect you,” Solomon said.

Now that it’s happened twice, Solomon won’t be able to file her taxes electronically anymore. The first incident stalled her $5,000 refund check by several months.

We recently had a post about how to keep this from happening to you. Here are some tips from us and from MarketWatch:

  • Have your refund direct-deposited into your bank account. It’s a little late for this now, but MarketWatch suggests you file as early as possible.
  • As soon as you realize that a fraudulent return has been filed in your name, call the IRS at (800) 908-4490. You will also need to complete Form 14039, which is an identity theft affidavit.
    Then report the incident to the Federal Trade Commission and set up a fraud alert with the major credit reporting agencies, MarketWatch says. It’s easy to do

It appears that tax return identity theft is quite lucrative. According to CBS Denver, “Federal officials estimate the IRS could issue some $26 billion in fraudulent tax refunds in the next few years if the agency doesn’t increase security.”

Have you or someone you know been a victim of tax return identity theft? Share your comments below or on our Facebook page.

Stacy Johnson

It's not the usual blah, blah, blah

I know... every site you visit wants you to subscribe to their newsletter. But our news and advice is actually worth reading! For 25 years, I've been making people richer without making their eyes glaze over. You'll be glad you did. I guarantee it!


Read Next: Sam’s Club Reveals Details of Black Friday, 5 Other Holiday Sales

Check Out Our Hottest Deals!

We're always adding new deals and coupons that'll save you big bucks. See the deals to the right and hundreds more in our Deals section.

Click here to explore 1,715 more deals!