Men in Same-Sex Marriages Trounce Straight Couples in Earnings

What's Hot


The Most Sinful City in the U.S. Is … (Hint: It’s Not Vegas)Family

How a Mexican Tariff Will Boost the Cost of 6 Common PurchasesFamily

This Free Software Brings Old Laptops Back to LifeMore

How to Protect Yourself From the ‘Can You Hear Me?’ Phone ScamFamily

Report: Walmart to Begin Selling CarsCars

Where to Sell Your Stuff for Top DollarAround The House

Is Your TV Tracking You? Here’s How to Tell — and Prevent ItAround The House

11 Staging Tips to Help You Get Top Dollar When Selling Your HomeAround The House

21 Restaurants Offering Free Food Right NowSaving Money

20 Simple Hacks to Make Your Stuff Last LongerAround The House

4 Car Insurers That Might Raise Rates Even When the Accident Wasn’t Your FaultCars

How to Invest If Trump Kills the ‘Fiduciary Rule’Grow

12 Surprising Ways to Wreck Your Credit ScoreBorrow

8 Tuition-Free U.S. CollegesCollege

These Are the 25 Best Jobs in the U.S.Jobs & Work

9 Secret Ways to Use Toothpaste That Will Make You SmileAround The House

The 2 Types of Music That Most Improve Dog BehaviorFamily

If all the married couples in the United States competed in a "bringing home the bacon" contest, gay men would be the runaway winners.

If all the married couples in the United States competed in a “bringing home the bacon” contest, gay men in same-sex marriages would be the clear-cut winners.

With an average household income of $176,000, married gay men in the United States earn roughly 56 percent more money than their married heterosexual counterparts ($113,000) and 42 percent more than married lesbian couples ($124,000).

That’s according to new data from the Treasury Department, which provide the most accurate snapshot to date of same-sex marriages in the U.S., including where same-sex couples live and how much money they earn.

The Treasury Department also found that in 2014, married men with children far outpaced all other married couples’ earnings — raking in nearly $275,000 on average.

According to The New York Times, the Treasury Department’s analysis says the income disparity between married heterosexuals and married same-sex couples can be attributed to several factors.

For example, same-sex couples are more inclined to live on the coasts and in major metropolitan areas, while average earnings tend to be higher than other regions of the U.S.

The impact of the gender pay gap is also clear. The Times says:

The math here is simple — for heterosexual couples, the gender pay gap affects one partner. For same-sex female couples, the gender pay gap affects both partners.

Also, the cost of child care can be a bigger burden on couples where at least one of the partners is female.

The Treasury Department also found that same-sex female couples are four times more likely than their married gay male peers to have children, which means those women are forced to try and balance a career and family or trade one for the other.

“Combine that with the likelihood of lower pay to begin with, and you start to understand why the income differences are so large,” explains the Times.

Are you surprised to see the income disparity between same-sex and opposite-sex married couples? Sound off below or on our Facebook page.

Stacy Johnson

It's not the usual blah, blah, blah

I know... every site you visit wants you to subscribe to their newsletter. But our news and advice is actually worth reading! For 25 years, I've been making people richer without making their eyes glaze over. You'll be glad you did. I guarantee it!

💰🗣📰

Read Next: 8 Ways to Get Your FICO Score for Free

Check Out Our Hottest Deals!

We're always adding new deals and coupons that'll save you big bucks. See the deals to the right and hundreds more in our Deals section.

Click here to explore 1,836 more deals!