Study: Fake Social Media Reviews Could Cost You

What's Hot


How to Cut the Cable TV Cord in 2017Family

8 Major Freebies and Discounts You Get With Amazon PrimeSave

Study: People Who Curse Are More HonestFamily

8 Creative Ways to Clear ClutterAround The House

15 Things You Should Always Buy at a Dollar StoreMore

Pay $2 and Get Unlimited Wendy’s Frosty Treats in 2017Family

5 Reasons to Shop for a Home in DecemberFamily

This Free Software Brings Old Laptops Back to LifeMore

Should You Donate to Wreaths Across America? A Lesson in Charitable GivingAround The House

6 Reasons Why Savers Are Sexier Than SpendersCredit & Debt

Resolutions 2017: Save More Money Using 5 Simple TricksCredit & Debt

10 Free Things That Used to Cost MoneyAround The House

7 New Year’s Resolutions to Make With Your KidsFamily

10 Simple Money Moves to Make Before the New YearFamily

The 3 Golden Rules of Lending to Friends and FamilyBorrow

Better read this before you consult your phone about your next meal out.

We’ve told you about fake product reviews on sites like Amazon and taught you how to avoid them. But now you’ve got to watch out for them not just on your computer but on your phone.

Mashable reports a rise in fake reviews of restaurants posted via social media:

For most of us, an exceptional number of top-notch online reviews determines which movie, hotel room, car or gadget we will choose over the competition. It’s the same for foodies deciding where to host a celebratory dinner or just looking for a great morning cup of joe.

What’s now a huge problem with falsified online restaurant reviews is going to explode over time. By 2014, 10% to 15% of social media reviews will be fake and paid for by companies, according to a new study by tech research company Gartner. Increased customer reliance on amateur reviews exacerbates unmerited ratings.

Increasingly, businesses buy forged and unmerited five-star reviews to stay on customers’ radars.

But there may be a silver lining, Gartner reports:

Organizations who opt to pay for phoney reviews can, and have, faced both public condemnation as well as monetary fines. In 2009, the FTC determined that paying for positive reviews without disclosing that the reviewer had been compensated equates to deceptive advertising and would be prosecuted as such.

Stacy Johnson

It's not the usual blah, blah, blah

I know... every site you visit wants you to subscribe to their newsletter. But our news and advice is actually worth reading! For 25 years, I've been making people richer without making their eyes glaze over. You'll be glad you did. I guarantee it!

💰🗣📰

Read Next: The 3 Golden Rules of Lending to Friends and Family

Check Out Our Hottest Deals!

We're always adding new deals and coupons that'll save you big bucks. See the deals to the right and hundreds more in our Deals section.

Click here to explore 1,797 more deals!