10 Ways to Save on Self Storage


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People own a lot of stuff. And they have a hard time letting go of it. Renting storage space may sometimes be necessary, but many people spend thousands to keep stuff they don't really care about.

Americans buy – and keep – a lot of stuff. That’s made self-storage a $22 billion industry, according to its major trade group, the Self Storage Association.

Most of us have seen them dotting the landscape. According to the SSA, 84 percent of all U.S. counties have at least one self-storage facility. It’s been “one of the fastest-growing sectors” of the commercial real estate industry for the past 35 years, the group says – and 10 percent of Americans rent them.

Some of us, of course, shouldn’t be using them. In the video below, Money Talks News founder Stacy Johnson shares his story of spending more than $18,000 in the past decade to store stuff worth only a fraction of that amount. He has some tips in the video: Watch it, then read on for more tips.

Hopefully that video convinced some of you pack rats to take a long, hard look at what’s going in your storage unit. Here’s more advice to save…

  1. Get more organized. It’s true that time is money, and going through all your stuff is a chore. But do you want to be paying rent on junk you’re never going to use again because you were too lazy to sort it out? Take a weekend and cull out the clutter. You’ll feel better, and save money. Hint: If you haven’t touched it in more than a year or forgot you even own it, odds are you don’t need it.
  2. Sell or donate stuff. If you’ve got a lot of property in good condition that you no longer need, maybe a “self-storage sale” (in your yard or garage, of course) is in order. Too much bother? Donate goods to charity for a tax deduction. Either option will help partially recoup the costs of storing the stuff you do keep.
  3. Weigh replacement cost. Some people keep everything, thinking, “I might need this someday,” while others get so eager they toss or sell stuff (especially furniture, which does take up a lot of space) they’ll end up buying again. Be realistic, because either mistake can be costly.
  4. Rent the smallest space you need. Storage units usually start at 5 by 5 feet and can be 8 feet or more tall. Practice your real-life Tetris skills and see what fits in there – you can always upgrade if you need to. If you’re looking at long-term storage, you also don’t need to leave space to be able to access and reach everything, so pack tight. Put the stuff you’ll need to pull out soonest at the front.
  5. Store with friends or family. If you know someone with extra garage space, ask if they’ll share. They might be more receptive to the idea if you offer to pay a few bucks a month – still cheaper than the commercial option.  Better yet, maybe you  have something they can borrow and use until you have space to reclaim it.
  6. Compare vs. apartments. Sometimes, storage space does make the most financial sense. If you have to upgrade to an apartment with another bedroom to store stuff you really need, $50 a month for storage space may beat $200 a month extra in rent. But if you’re living in a condo or townhouse with a homeowner’s association, ask if they have storage space for rent – it might be cheaper than public storage units.
  7. Haggle. The recession hasn’t exactly ravaged the self-storage industry. According to this article in the New York Times, occupancies at storage facilities nationwide are down 2 to 3 percent. Still, with occupancies down, your odds of negotiating a better deal are higher. Compare rates and pit them against each other. Start with SelfStorage.com, where you can search by zip code for prices.
  8. Check discounts. Some storage companies offer “move-in” specials with discounted rates or maybe a month free. There may be discounts for seniors, and SSA-affiliated storage companies are offering military perks, including: “10%-30% discounts off rental rates, free months of rent, gift certificates, free use of moving truck, one-dollar move-ins, no rent increases while deployed overseas, waiver of security deposits, administration fees, etc.”
  9. Buy your own. If you’re considering renting storage space, you’re going to have to buy at least a padlock anyway. While you’re shopping for one, check the price for other self-storage options. You may be able to fit everything in your garage by buying a few shelving units and plastic bins, or a stand-alone shed. These items may cost more than a couple of months of renting, but save money in the long term.
  10. Buy less stuff. The best way to reduce future storage costs is to own less. That sounds obvious, but most of us are a lot better at buying goods than losing them. Be a minimalist, not a hoarder.  Your house will look better, you’ll feel better, and your bank account will thank you for it.

Ready to clear out your clutter? Make some money with 13 Tips for a Super Yard Sale.

Stacy Johnson

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