How to Get All Your iPhone Apps for Free

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I’m addicted to iPhone apps. I love downloading new ones, whether they’re games I’ve never played before or some new must-have feature to my phone that I quickly come to depend on. iTunes puts my current app count at 443, but I’m sure there are many more I downloaded directly to my phone but deleted before syncing with my computer.

To amass such a collection, I’ve spent surprisingly little. In fact, most of my apps I’ve gotten for free – even those that normally cost money. How? AppShopper.

AppShopper is both a website and a free iPhone app that tracks app prices over time. Whenever something on the App Store goes on sale or is offered for free, it’s posted on AppShopper. All the discerning consumer needs to do is look at a list and click/tap on anything that’s both interesting and currently free. Using this method, I’ve picked up more fun-looking games than I could possibly have time to play.

AppShopper also lets you create a “wish list” of apps you’d like to buy. If you use their iPhone app, you’ll automatically be alerted by push notification when one of your desired apps drops in price. And trust me, at some point, every app drops in price.

Thanks to programs like Free App a Day, many high-quality, super-popular apps have found their way to my iPhone, completely free. Others, like the games that are usually $7.99, $9.99, or even $12.99 will drop to 99 cents several times a year.

So if you want to get free iPhone apps and you’re willing to wait until a pop-up on your phone tells you to buy, there’s no reason you can’t fill up your iPhone with great apps for absolutely nothing.

For more on iPhone apps, check out 10 Best Money Saving iPhone Apps and 5 Smartphone Apps That Can Earn You Money.

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    Unauthorized Charges on Your Local Phone – Utility Bill? R2
    FCC fines Verizon over ‘mystery’ fees $25 million and $52 million in refunds – 10/28/2010
     
    How to Find Them, Eliminate Them & Get Your Money Back!
    If your business still gets its phone service through the old “AT&T and Verizon, etc” local phone company (as opposed to one of the newer competitive phone providers) then you need to double check your phone bill each and every month for charges you did not authorize. You may not know it but the local phone company allows other companies to bill you through your local phone bill. And while the local phone company allows other businesses to bill you through your local phone bill, the local phone company does not verify that the charges being billed to you by the other company are valid. When these unauthorized charges fraudulently appear on your phone bill it’s called “cramming”. Unfortunately you as the business owner or manager are the only one that can spot the unauthorized charges and if you don’t comb over your bill every month to spot these unauthorized charges – you’ll pay for them.
    Customers get crammed when a dishonest company puts charges on their phone bill (landline or wireless) for services that were not wanted or authorized.
    Why does the local phone company allow other companies to pass charges onto your phone bill? “Third-party billing” is supposedly a great convenience in that you only have to pay one bill instead of separate bills for obvious authorized phone related charges like yellow-page advertising in the “real yellow pages”, 411 information calls and long-distance calls from your chosen long distance carrier. Over the years though, some less-than-scrupulous companies have realized that most businesses rarely scrutinize their local-phone bills. To take advantage of this, these companies have come up with elaborate schemes to place unauthorized charges on your phone bill that you’ll end up paying for without even thinking. Unauthorized charges you can end up paying for include charges for unwanted (and unused) email accounts, web sites, directory information calls, directory advertising in obscure publications, voice mail accounts and other services.
    In theory, before these charges can be placed on your phone bill, the company that is originating the third-party billed charges is supposed to have a verification of the order like a voice recording. In reality though, all the company needs to do to initiate the charge is submit your name and phone number to the billing entity. The verifications are only required to be produced if a complaint is filed.
    To prevent these charges from appearing on you business phone bill it’s helpful to understand the four parties that make unauthorized third party phone charges a costly reality. Party number one is any employee who can answer your business phones. The  un-authorized charge is rarely random and it usually happens after one of your company employees gets a telemarketing call. Employees should be instructed to document and report any overly aggressive telemarketing calls they receive. Party number two is the telemarketing company that originates the unauthorized charges by trying to get your employee to accept some service for which you’ll be billed through your local phone bill. Party number three is the third-party billing company that has billing agreements with your local phone company. The name of the third-party billing is the one that is prominently displayed on your phone bill. After the third-party billing company’s name is the name of the company that is originating the unwanted charges. Party number four is your “former Ma Bell” local phone company that collects the unwanted charges (keeps a share for “Ma”) and then passes the rest to the third-party billing company (who keeps a big share) and then passes the balance on to the company that initiated the unwanted charge.
    Third-party charges on U.S. consumer and business telephone bills, most of them unauthorized by the customer, amount to US $2 billion a year, according to a new report from a U.S. Senate committee.
    Unauthorized third-party charges on telephone bills, often called cramming, cost one national retail chain $550,000 over the last decade, not including the $400,000 the company spent to fight the mystery charges, said the report, resulting from a year-long investigation by the Senate Commerce, Science and Transportation Committee.
    Telephone carriers have made more than $1 billion[b] in revenue from third-party charges in the past decade, said Senator John “Jay” Rockefeller, a West Virginia Democrat and committee chairman. Carriers get a fee for placing third-party charges on bills, according to the report.
    The best way for consumers to protect themselves is to call their local phone company and request that it shut off third-party billing services — many will, for free.  Consumers who’ve been crammed and scammed should call their local phone company and insist on a refund; they should also file a complaint with their state attorney general’s office and the FTC. But most important: Scan those phone bills every month for surprise charges and unwanted services. They’re easy to miss.
    **Following are some of the top third-party billing names and unauthorized charge originators you’ll find on your phone bill. If you see these names on your phone bill you’ll want to call the toll free number listed next to the charge to confirm it’s a charge that’s been properly authorized to be placed on your bill. Following are actual examples that we’ve recently found while auditing business phone bills.
    We recommend customers should review any utility bills issued by deregulated utility companies. (In most instances today, consumers are paying higher charges to the deregulated gas and electric supply companies).
    All Utility – Energy, gas, electric and water bills should be reviewed for proper reading and tariff.
    If you suspect that you have been overcharged ask for detailed explanation and or file a complaint with your State Utility Commission.
    YJ Draiman for Mayor of LA