You Might Have ‘Hundreds’ of Credit Scores: Here’s How to Keep Them Rising

What's Hot


How a Mexican Tariff Will Boost the Cost of 6 Common PurchasesFamily

Report: Walmart to Begin Selling CarsCars

How to Protect Yourself From the ‘Can You Hear Me?’ Phone ScamFamily

Trump Scraps FHA Rate Cut — What Does It Mean for You?Borrow

This Free Software Brings Old Laptops Back to LifeMore

10 Overlooked Expenses That Ruin Your BudgetFamily

Protecting Trump Will Cost Taxpayers $35 MillionFamily

8 Creative Ways to Clear ClutterAround The House

8 Tuition-Free U.S. CollegesCollege

Study: People Who Curse Are More HonestFamily

Tax Hacks 2017: Don’t Miss These 16 Often-Overlooked Tax BreaksTaxes

The 3 Golden Rules of Lending to Friends and FamilyBorrow

Porta-Potties for Presidential Inauguration Cause a StinkFamily

12 Surprising Ways to Wreck Your Credit ScoreBorrow

These Are the 25 Best Jobs in the U.S.Jobs & Work

You might have hundreds of credit scores attached to your name. Learn the two-step process to keeping them strong.

Hopefully you’re familiar with what many consider the gold standard of credit scores, FICO. Perhaps you even know about the alternative VantageScore.

But it turns out those are just two of who-knows-how-many credit scores lenders might use to gauge your creditworthiness — or even to decide how much interest to charge you. According to a new CNN Money report:

It’s not that easy to figure out exactly what score a lender is using, because you have more than just one. A lot more.

Rod Griffin, director of public education at the credit reporting agency Experian, estimates that consumers can have hundreds of credit scores.

CNN reports that reasons for this include that:

  • There are actually 19 different types of FICO scores, although the one known as FICO Score 8 is most commonly used.
  • Each of the three national credit bureaus — Equifax, Experian and TransUnion — uses different information and scoring methods to build its own credit report on you.
  • Some lenders have their own version of your credit score, either because a scoring company like FICO created a customized score for the lender or because some lenders have their own credit scoring methods.

So what’s a consumer to do when it’s essentially impossible to know which of your credit scores a lender might examine? The best thing you can do is stay on top of your credit. If your financial behavior is sound, your credit score will reflect that — regardless of which score a lender examines.

Here are two steps to keeping your credit strong:

1. Learn what you can about your credit

Websites like Credit Sesame provide free credit scores and credit reporting analysis. The three national credit bureaus are required to provide you with one free credit report each year, which you can obtain at annualcreditreport.com

For more ways to get your score for free, check out “Ask Stacy: Where Can I Get a Free Credit Score?

2. Do what you can to bolster your credit

Money Talks News founder Stacy Johnson breaks this down in “How to Get a Perfect 850 FICO Credit Score Automatically.”

You might struggle to implement some of Stacy’s guidelines if you’re already carrying debt, though. If that’s the case, check out the Money Talks News Solutions Center, where you can find help with:

What do you make of the news that you could have hundreds of credit scores? Sound off below or on Facebook.

Stacy Johnson

It's not the usual blah, blah, blah

I know... every site you visit wants you to subscribe to their newsletter. But our news and advice is actually worth reading! For 25 years, I've been making people richer without making their eyes glaze over. You'll be glad you did. I guarantee it!

💰🗣📰

Read Next: Ask Stacy: Where Can I Find Help With Credit Card Debt?

Disclosure: The information you read here is always objective. However, we sometimes receive compensation when you click links within our stories.

Check Out Our Hottest Deals!

We're always adding new deals and coupons that'll save you big bucks. See the deals to the right and hundreds more in our Deals section.

Click here to explore 1,844 more deals!