US Population Barely Grew at All in 2013

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The growth of the U.S. population slowed to a crawl last year, and many think the economy was to blame.

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the population increased from 316,128,839 to 317,297,938 in the past year, which represents a 0.7 percent change from New Year’s Day 2013.

This is “the lowest rate in more than seven decades,” Wiliam Frey, a demographer at the Brookings Institution in Washington, D.C., told The New York Times.

The slow growth rate may be a direct result of the “aging baby boomer population and slower immigration,” reports USA Today.

Others think the slow population growth — the lowest rate since the Great Depression — “is a reflection of the recession’s lingering effects on people’s behavior,” says The Washington Post. During the recession, people put off having children, and the number of immigrants who came to the U.S. in search of work declined. The Post added:

“Economists think the recession is over, but it’s not, for demographic trends,” said Ken Johnson, a demographer with the Carsey Institute at the University of New Hampshire. “We should see growth going up.”

Here are a few other interesting facts from the U.S. and World Population Clock:

  • One birth will occur every 8 seconds in the U.S.
  • One person will die every 12 seconds in the U.S.
  • The U.S. will have a net gain of one person every 17 seconds.
  • California was the most populous state in 2013 with 38,332,521 residents.
  • The world population reached 7 billion in 2012 and is expected to reach 8 billion in 2025.

Demographers believe that the nation’s growth rate will rise as people’s faith in the economy is restored, the Post says.

What are your thoughts on the projected population growth? Let us know in the comments below or on our Facebook page.

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Comments & discussion

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  • Rick Schiavone

    Yep…the newest generation loves and adopts “pets” instead of starting a Family!!!

  • Laura

    Good maybe people have finally started to wake up and realize we cannot sustain a 7+ billion population on this plant. With so much uncertainty and turmoil in the world who in there right mind would want to bring children, or more children into this world. Economically most people can barley take care of one child let alone 2, 3, 4 or more with out some kind of public assistance. so add that to the list of many reasons a population decrease isn’t a horrible thing.

  • KaraLynn

    Every time I think that I should not bring children into this world because of how horrible it is, I remind myself that this is often a matter of perspective. I can easily justify bringing children into this world to help make it better. If I teach my children to see the world as a dark and doomed place to live, they will see it that way. However, if I influence them to help change it for the better, they will grow up in confidence for their future. Children are the blessings that make my family whole and it is therefore my responsibility to raise them to be productive members of society. It gives me hope that they will contribute to making a better world for themselves and for their families. I have one child now and one on the way. A side point of questionable relevance, our poverty line income has never been used as a crutch to receive public assistance. We live comfortably without it, so I can’t justify taking it from someone who could benefit from it.