How Your Drinking Habit Is Killing the Economy

Photo (cc) by m_shipp22

The increasing costs of Americans’ drinking are giving the economy a hangover, according to the government.

A study released by the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found that the costs of excessive drinking increased by more than $25 billion from 2006 to 2010. The study was published this month in the peer-reviewed American Journal of Preventative Medicine.

According to the CDC, excessive drinking cost the U.S. $249 billion, or $2.05 per drink, in 2010. That’s up from $223.5 billion, or $1.90 per drink, in 2006.

Government shouldered $100.7 billion of that $249 billion in costs — about 40 percent.

Dr. Robert Brewer, head of the CDC’s Alcohol Program and one of the study’s authors, states in a news release:

“The increase in the costs of excessive drinking from 2006 to 2010 is concerning, particularly given the severe economic recession that occurred during these years. Effective prevention strategies can reduce excessive drinking and related costs in states and communities, but they are under used.”

In 2010, the tolls were highest in:

  • California — highest overall cost ($35 billion)
  • Washington, D.C. — highest cost per person ($1,526)
  • New Mexico — highest cost per drink ($2.77)

Most costs attributed to excessive drinking stemmed from:

  • Reduced workplace productivity
  • Crime
  • Health problems and deaths

More than three-fourths of the costs — 77 percent — were connected to binge drinking. The CDC defines this practice as having five or more drinks on one occasion for men, or four or more for women.

Do you think it’s possible that alcohol consumption results in such high costs in the U.S.? Let us know what you think about the CDC’s findings below or on Facebook.

Disclosure: The information you read here is always objective. However, we sometimes receive compensation when you click links within our stories.

Most Popular
New Retirement Bill Would Help Savers of All Ages
New Retirement Bill Would Help Savers of All Ages

With bipartisan support, this bill could help millions of workers and retirees boost or conserve their retirement savings.

If You Find This Thrift Shopping, Buy It
If You Find This Thrift Shopping, Buy It

This iconic dinnerware is prized for everyday use as well as reselling for profit.

3 Colors That Can Ruin Your Car’s Resale Value
3 Colors That Can Ruin Your Car’s Resale Value

Select the wrong color for your next car, and it could depreciate twice as fast as others.

20 Things That Are Actually Worth Stockpiling
20 Things That Are Actually Worth Stockpiling

You don’t need a year’s supply of toilet paper to survive an outbreak, but consider stocking up on these items.

9 of the Best Things to Do When You Retire
9 of the Best Things to Do When You Retire

You’ve waited all your life for this moment. Make the most of your retirement.

What Inflation Means for Social Security Checks in 2022
What Inflation Means for Social Security Checks in 2022

Recent inflation figures were ugly. Here’s what they hint about the next Social Security benefits adjustment.

View More Articles

View this page without ads

Help us produce more money-saving articles and videos by subscribing to a membership.

Get Started

Add a Comment

Our Policy: We welcome relevant and respectful comments in order to foster healthy and informative discussions. All other comments may be removed. Comments with links are automatically held for moderation.