Ask Stacy: How Do I Know When an Email Is Safe?

Photo (cc) by Oran Viriyincy

Those of you who have been around the web for a while may find this question quaint, but actually, it’s a good one:

Dear Mr. Johnson;
You were very helpful in responding to my last e-mail in reference to “working from home without getting worked over.” Thank you for the information there.

Now, if I may and you would, I would like some more information. I am actually fairly new to the internet, a friend of mine suggested that there are addresses that it is better to stay completely away from. Especially responding to incoming mail. Reason being viral problems, and as before, I want to avoid scams.

Could I get you to provide for me a list of addresses to avoid especially responding to. I really do appreciate the assistance.

Thank you again for your time and energy.

Sincerely,
Tony from Michgan

Here’s your answer, Tony…(and by the way, I’m Stacy. My father is Mr. Johnson 🙂

The fact is that most companies that send you an unsolicited, commercial email are probably breaking the law. According to the The Can-Spam Act 2003

(A) IN GENERAL – It is unlawful for any person to initiate the transmission to a protected computer of a commercial electronic mail message that does not contain a functioning return electronic mail address or other Internet-based mechanism, clearly and conspicuously displayed, that
(i) a recipient may use to submit, in a manner specified in the message, a reply electronic mail message or other form of Internet-based communication requesting not to receive future commercial electronic mail messages from that sender at the electronic mail address where the message was received; and
(ii) remains capable of receiving such messages or communications for no less than 30 days after the transmission of the original message.

What this legal mumbo-jumbo says is that any commercial enterprise that sends you an email must include language that allows you to opt out of future mailings.

For example, take the Money Talks Newsletter you receive from me. Here’s a cut-and-paste from the bottom of each one…

You are receiving this email because you signed up at moneytalksnews.com. If you no longer wish to receive emails from Money Talks News, click here to unsubscribe.

If you click the “unsubscribe” link, I’ve got 30 days to take you off my email list (although with our mailing list you’re off pretty much immediately).

So if you ever get any solicitation from any company that doesn’t include a clear “opt out” link like the one above, that company is breaking the law. And anyone breaking the law certainly doesn’t warrant your response.

Note that I’m not telling you to actually click on the “unsubscribe” link, if there is one – you could merely be confirming your email address, which will in turn be sold to other spammers. But if there’s no notice like that on emails you receive, you know immediately that it should be deleted without hesitation.

Here are some additional safety tips:

  1. Don’t open unexpected attachments
    Viruses are often sent via email attachments. You should have virus-scanning software that scans your incoming email, but nonetheless don’t ever open attachments unless you’re absolutely certain you know who they’re from.
  2. Use spam filters
    Your email program probably has spam filters. If you’re not sure how to use them, go the help section of your software and type in “spam filter.” Make sure it’s activated.
  3. Beware of spoof emails or phishing
    Banks and other businesses you do business with know better than to send you emails requesting personal information. So if you get requests like that, you’re probably looking at phishing – thieves attempting to rip you off. If you have a doubt, call the bank or other institution directly and ask if they contacted you via email.
  4. Don’t send sensitive data in email
    Be aware that even in the best of circumstances, it’s possible your email can be compromised. If you’re sending something sensitive to someone, like your social security number, don’t. Call them.
  5. Avoid clicking on links in the body of an email message
    Unless you are completely comfortable that the email is legitimate, it is best to copy and paste the link or type it in directly in your browser.
  6. Guard your email address
    It’s a good idea to have two email addresses – one that you use for people you know and one that you use when you shop or deal with companies. If only your friends have your email address, at least you’ll know emails you receive at that address are more likely to be OK.

Bottom line, Tony? Like many people reading this, I get hundreds of emails every day. I immediately delete any trying to sell me something, unless it’s a company I signed up to receive emails from – very rare. About the only emails I read and/or respond to are those from people I know or people I want to know – like you and my other readers.

Hope that helps!

Got more money questions? Browse lots more Ask Stacy answers here.

Disclosure: The information you read here is always objective. However, we sometimes receive compensation when you click links within our stories.

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