For Sale: Harry Potter’s Childhood Home

Photo by Oldrich / Shutterstock.com

You can now live in Harry Potter’s childhood home.

That’s right. If you have 475,000 pounds — approximately $620,000 — and you don’t mind living on the outskirts of London, the three-bedroom house where Harry Potter was left on the steps as a baby can be yours.

Before he was accepted into Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry, Potter spent 11 miserable years living in a cupboard under the stairs of “4 Privet Drive” in the fictional town of Little Whinging, according to an account in The Telegraph. Harry resided there with his wicked aunt and uncle, Vernon and Petunia Dursley, and their spoiled son, Dudley.

The Telegraph reports:

The house (is) in Bracknell, Berkshire, rather than the fictive Little Whinging dreamt up by J. K. Rowling, but is otherwise as it appeared in the films.

You can check out the listing online, which includes photos of most rooms and a tidy backyard. The photos do not show the cupboard under the stairs.

Would you like to live in Harry Potter’s house? Let us know below or on our Facebook page.

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