Here’s How Much Money Janitors Make in Your State

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We humans make big messes all over the place — restaurants, offices, public restrooms and schools. Janitors do the dirty work to make it all sparkly and clean again, only for us to trash it all again the next day.

Surely, janitors don’t get nearly enough credit, much less enough money, for all their hard work. But how much, or little, do these folks get paid?

Nationally, janitors and cleaners earn an average of $28,950 per year as of 2018, the latest year for which data is available from the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS).

From state to state, though, those figures can vary. In the top-ranked state for janitor and cleaner wages, the average worker earns about $13,500 more each year than in the lowest-ranked state.

Read on to see where pay for janitors and cleaners in your state ranks compared with other states, and how many full- and part-time workers are employed in those jobs there.

This group excludes maids and housekeeping cleaners. These salaries are for workers who do heavy cleanup in buildings — cleaning floors and shampooing carpet, washing walls and glass and picking up trash. They may also have maintenance duties, from tending furnaces and boilers to clearing sidewalks of snow and debris.

50. Louisiana

Suzanne Tucker / Shutterstock.com

Average annual wage: $22,030

Average hourly wage: $10.59

Number of these workers classified as full- or part-time employees: 27,100

Janitorial workers in the Bayou State might have to clean up after folks who make 10 times what they do — including surgeons ($121.94 per hour, on average) and chief executives ($100.05 per hour), according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics’ wage estimates for occupations in the state.

49. Mississippi

Mark McElroy / Shutterstock.com

Average annual wage: $22,120

Average hourly wage: $10.63

Number of these workers classified as full- or part-time employees: 18,170

Getting paid one of the worst wages of all occupations in Mississippi is bad enough. But that’s compounded for janitors and cleaners with kids, since the Magnolia State is ranked as the second-worst state in which to raise a family, according to a Money Talks News report.

48. South Carolina

Yuganov Konstantin / Shutterstock.com

Average annual wage: $23,370

Average hourly wage: $11.23

Number of these workers classified as full- or part-time employees: 31,980

Don’t lose your janitorial job — or any other job — if you live in the Palmetto State. Only seven states have worse unemployment benefits than South Carolina, according to a recent analysis by Howmuch.net.

47. Arkansas

Kzenon / Shutterstock.com

Average annual wage: $23,520

Average hourly wage: $11.31

Number of these workers classified as full- or part-time employees: 15,930

Fortunately, unmarried janitors with no kids in the Natural State have a decent chance to make ends meet.

In Arkansas, janitors and cleaners’ average hourly wage of $11.31 is a tad more than the living wage for a one-person household, $10.62 per hour, as Money Talks News reported in July, citing the Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s Living Wage Calculator.

46. Oklahoma

Scrub bathroom
ndriano.cz / Shutterstock.com

Average annual wage: $23,670

Average hourly wage: $11.38

Number of these workers classified as full- or part-time employees: 19,680

The silver lining for Oklahoma janitors and cleaners is that the cost of living in the Sooner State was the second-lowest in the country as of the second quarter of this year, according to the Missouri Economic Research and Information Center. Only Mississippi ranked lower for its cost of living.

45. Alabama

Dmitry Kalinovsky / Shutterstock.com

Average annual wage: $23,700

Average hourly wage: $11.39

Number of these workers classified as full- or part-time employees: 28,770

As if the low pay wasn’t rough enough, the Heart of Dixie also is the fifth-worst state in which to raise a family, as Money Talks News reports.

That’s mainly because the state has the nation’s highest infant mortality rate and highest rate of families living in poverty.

44. Georgia

Natali_Mis / Shutterstock.com

Average annual wage: $24,180

Average hourly wage: $11.63

Number of these workers classified as full- or part-time employees: 54,630

The Peach State isn’t so peachy for families — it’s among the 10 worst states for raising a family, as Money Talks News reports, citing a study from WalletHub.

Georgia ranked particularly low in the categories of health and safety, and education and child care.

43. North Carolina

Africa Studio / Shutterstock.com

Average annual wage: $24,190

Average hourly wage: $11.63

Number of these workers classified as full- or part-time employees: 55,960

Janitorial workers make only about $2.50 more per hour than fast-food cooks, who occupy the lowest rung on the wage ladder in the Tar Heel State.

Janitors’ hourly wages aren’t even up to speed with what’s considered a living wage in the state, the minimum needed for basic necessities, which in Arkansas is $11.79 per hour for a one-person household.

42. New Mexico

Andrey_Popov / Shutterstock.com

Average annual wage: $24,320

Average hourly wage: $11.69

Number of these workers classified as full- or part-time employees: 11,910

Unfortunately, the Land of Enchantment ranks as the worst state in which to raise a family, as Money Talks News reports, citing a study from WalletHub.

41. Tennessee

Andrey_Popov / Shutterstock.com

Average annual wage: $24,430

Average hourly wage: $11.75

Number of these workers classified as full- or part-time employees: 38,400

The living wage needed for basic necessities in Volunteer State is among the nation’s lowest at $10.75 for a one-person household, as Money Talks News reports, citing Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s Living Wage Calculator.

40. Texas

Dmitry Kalinovsky / Shutterstock.com

Average annual wage: $24,870

Average hourly wage: $11.96

Number of these workers classified as full- or part-time employees: 163,760

If you’re going to be cleaning up after other people for a living, why not do it in Austin?

This tech hub of the American Southwest is ranked No. 1 by U.S. News & World Report in its “125 Best Places to Live in the USA” survey. The Texas state capital earns major points for its music, outdoor spaces and cultural institutions.

39. Utah

Mark Halding / Shutterstock.com

Average annual wage: $25,270

Average hourly wage: $12.15

Number of these workers classified as full- or part-time employees: 22,680

U.S. News & World Reports ranks Salt Lake City No. 24 in its “125 Best Places to Live in the USA” survey.

The city hosted the 2002 Winter Olympics, is near five national parks and offers amazing skiing within a doable driving distance.

These days, alcohol and coffee are indeed available here, despite the city’s traditional status as a stronghold of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, a faith that prohibits consuming such beverages.

38. Florida

Woman cleaning counter, in soft focus.
VGstockstudio / Shutterstock.com

Average annual wage: $25,450

Average hourly wage: $12.24

Number of these workers classified as full- or part-time employees: 124,460

When the cost of living is considered, janitors in Miami have the third-lowest median wage among metro areas of the U.S., according to the Service Employees International Union. The union estimates that wages have increased a scant 1.6% in the past two decades.

37. Idaho

THINK A / Shutterstock.com

Average annual wage: $25,770

Average hourly wage: $12.39

Number of these workers classified as full- or part-time employees: 9,970

Idaho has the sixth-hottest economy in the nation, as Money Talks News reports.

The Gem State has been at or under 3% unemployment for 21 straight months, as of August.

36. Kansas

Andrey_Popov / Shutterstock.com

Average annual wage: $25,900

Average hourly wage: $12.45

Number of these workers classified as full- or part-time employees: 19,520

Outside its cities, Kansas has the highest rate of employment of janitors among non-metropolitan areas across the U.S., according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Other states with high concentrations of janitor jobs in non-metro areas include Ohio, Iowa, North Carolina and Texas.

35. South Dakota

Andrey_Popov / Shutterstock.com

Average annual wage: $25,900

Average hourly wage: $12.45

Number of these workers classified as full- or part-time employees: 8,300

If averages hold true, a janitor in the Mount Rushmore State will be able to survive on his or her hourly wage, since the living wage in this state is $10.38 per hour.

In fact, South Dakota has the lowest living wage for a one-person household in the U.S., Money Talks News reports.

34. Kentucky

liza54500 / Shutterstock.com

Average annual wage: $25,940

Average hourly wage: $12.47

Number of these workers classified as full- or part-time employees: 26,330

Lexington, home to the University of Kentucky, ranks 29th in U.S. News & World Report’s “125 Best Places to Live in the USA” listing.

The equestrian industry and culture in the Bluegrass State are huge, as is the bourbon industry. In fact, 2 out of 5 people older than 25 in Lexington have bachelor’s degrees, the U.S. News report says.

33. West Virginia

Female cleaner with gloves and apron
paulaphoto / Shutterstock.com

Average annual wage: $26,000

Average hourly wage: $12.50

Number of these workers classified as full- or part-time employees: 8,380

West Virginia has the fifth-slowest-growing state economy in the country, Money Talks News reported earlier this year.

That ranking was based on 28 factors, including economic activity, economic health and innovation potential.

32. Virginia

Viacheslav Nikolaenko / Shutterstock.com

Average annual wage: $26,340

Average hourly wage: $12.66

Number of these workers classified as full- or part-time employees: 63,050

Harrisonburg, Virginia, has the highest concentration of janitors of all metropolitan areas in the country, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. There are 27 janitors for every 1,000 jobs in the Shenandoah Valley city.

31. Arizona

Suzanne Tucker / Shutterstock.com

Average annual wage: $26,410

Average hourly wage: $12.70

Number of these workers classified as full- or part-time employees: 35,320

Sprawling Phoenix is ranked No. 26 by U.S. News & World Report in its “125 Best Places to Live in the USA.” One key reason for this distinction: The metro area known as the Valley of the Sun reportedly gets more sunshine than any other metro in the country.

City life, desert life, colleges, sports, recreation — it’s all there in Phoenix.

30. Indiana

Dmitry Kalinovsky / Shutterstock.com

Average annual wage: $26,900

Average hourly wage: $12.93

Number of these workers classified as full- or part-time employees: 44,560

Janitors in the Hoosier State have the ninth-lowest cost of living in the country, according to the Missouri Economic Research and Information Center.

29. Michigan

Andrey_Popov / Shutterstock.com

Average annual wage: $27,230

Average hourly wage: $13.09

Number of these workers classified as full- or part-time employees: 57,850

The Wolverine State has the seventh-lowest cost of living in the nation, according to the Missouri Economic Research and Information Center.

The cost of groceries is relatively cheap in Michigan, compared with other states, but the state is among the more expensive for transportation costs, according to the center.

28. Nebraska

Siyanight / Shutterstock.com

Average annual wage: $27,350

Average hourly wage: $13.15

Number of these workers classified as full- or part-time employees: 14,340

U.S. News & World Report ranks the Cornhusker State’s largest city, Omaha, No. 32 in its “125 Best Places to Live in the USA” survey.

The ranking is in part thanks to its melding of hip and old country, steakhouse and vegan. Tech startups are luring young professionals, and Omaha’s education options and family-friendly activities make it a great place to raise a family.

27. Missouri

zentradyi3ell / Shutterstock.com

Average annual wage: $27,470

Average hourly wage: $13.21

Number of these workers classified as full- or part-time employees: 40,070

The Show-Me State has the fourth-lowest cost of living in the country, according to the Missouri Economic Research and Information Center.

One factor in that ranking, according to MERIC estimates, is that the state has the third-cheapest housing costs in the U.S.

26. Ohio

Vizual Studio / Shutterstock.com

Average annual wage: $27,930

Average hourly wage: $13.43

Number of these workers classified as full- or part-time employees: 81,910

The Bureau of Labor Statistics says the north-northeastern area of Ohio has the second-highest number of janitors among all non-metropolitan areas of the U.S., with 4,870 janitors as of 2018. It ranks behind only the non-metropolitan area of Kansas for that distinction.

25. Iowa

taviphoto / Shutterstock.com

Average annual wage: $28,030

Average hourly wage: $13.48

Number of these workers classified as full- or part-time employees: 24,730

Des Moines is the fifth-best city in which to live in the U.S., according to this year’s rankings from U.S. News & World Report.

That makes the Hawkeye State’s capital a great draw for families, millennials and those looking for a homey yet hip city life.

24. Wisconsin

Africa Studio / Shutterstock.com

Average annual wage: $28,200

Average hourly wage: $13.56

Number of these workers classified as full- or part-time employees: 43,650

The Badger State’s capital, Madison, is ranked No. 12 by U.S. News & World Report in its “125 Best Places to Live in the USA” listing.

This growing city, home of the University of Wisconsin, has excellent cultural and culinary offerings. Its economy boasts particular strength in the areas of health care, information technology and manufacturing.

23. Maryland

Audrey_Popov / Shutterstock.com

Average annual wage: $28,370

Average hourly wage: $13.64

Number of these workers classified as full- or part-time employees: 41,800

The Old Line State has the seventh-highest cost of living in the country. Even so, health care is relatively cheap in Maryland, in comparison with other states, says the Missouri Economic Research and Information Center.

22. Delaware

Diego Cervo / Shutterstock.com

Average annual wage: $28,530

Average hourly wage: $13.71

Number of these workers classified as full- or part-time employees: 8,720

Low-income residents of Delaware pay only 5.24% of their income to taxes, the lowest percentage in the country, Money Talks News reported earlier this year.

Middle-income residents of “the First State” pay the second-lowest percentage of taxes in the nation.

21. Pennsylvania

Serenethos / Shutterstock.com

Average annual wage: $28,730

Average hourly wage: $13.81

Number of these workers classified as full- or part-time employees: 90,690

Pennsylvania has the fifth-highest number of janitors in the nation, with 90,690 janitorial jobs, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Philadelphia; Camden, New Jersey; and Wilmington, Delaware, are part of the metropolitan area with the sixth-highest number of janitors in the nation, according to BLS.

20. Colorado

Andrey_Popov / Shutterstock.com

Average annual wage: $28,980

Average hourly wage: $13.93

Number of these workers classified as full- or part-time employees: 34,350

The Rocky Mountain State boasts the No. 2 and No. 3 cities in U.S. News & World Report’s “125 Best Places to Live in the USA” survey — Denver and Colorado Springs, respectively.

Those cities have military bases, fine universities and myriad outdoor recreation opportunities.

19. Wyoming

didesign021 / Shutterstock.com

Average annual wage: $29,340

Average hourly wage: $14.10

Number of these workers classified as full- or part-time employees: 4,650

Janitors and custodians at the University of Wyoming clean more than 6 million square feet of floor space on an average day, according to the university’s student newspaper, The Branding Iron.

Workers arrive at 4 a.m., before the students enter buildings.

“In some of these buildings, it’s hard to get into classrooms, so we really have to pick our battles and make sure that we get everywhere,” says Tod Scott, director of Custodial Services.

18. New Hampshire

ALPA PROD / Shutterstock.com

Average annual wage: $29,420

Average hourly wage: $14.14

Number of these workers classified as full- or part-time employees: 9,450

The Granite State has a significantly lower unemployment rate than the nation — 2.5%, in July, compared with the national rate that month of 3.7%, Money Talks News reports.

However, New Hampshire ranks No. 30 based on the amount of its weekly unemployment insurance benefit, $427.

17. Montana

Dragon Images / Shutterstock.com

Average annual wage: $29,790

Average hourly wage: $14.32

Number of these workers classified as full- or part-time employees: 7,520

Janitors may not make CEO-level pay in Montana (or anywhere), but low-income Montanans enjoy the third-lowest overall tax burden as a percentage of income in the nation, 6.77%, Money Talks News reported this year.

16. Oregon

Andrey_Popov / Shutterstock.com

Average annual wage: $29,860

Average hourly wage: $14.35

Number of these workers classified as full- or part-time employees: 23,950

In only four states and the District of Columbia is there a higher cost of living than in Oregon.

Among factors leading to that ranking, the Beaver State has one of the highest transportation costs, according to the Missouri Economic Research and Information Center.

15. Maine

Hand with rag cleaning table top
Luisa Leal Photography / Shutterstock.com

Average annual wage: $29,940

Average hourly wage: $14.40

Number of these workers classified as full- or part-time employees: 11,230

The cost of a starter home in Maine is in the middle of the pack nationwide, with a median value of $135,800.

The housing market statewide cooled off this past summer, compared with the summer of 2018, when home values were rising more quickly, according to a Money Talks News report.

14. Nevada

Andrey_Popov / Shutterstock.com

Average annual wage: $30,380

Average hourly wage: $14.61

Number of these workers classified as full- or part-time employees: 29,300

Nevada has the highest concentration of janitors in the nation, with nearly 22 janitors for every 1,000 jobs, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

The Silver State had 29,300 janitors in total as of May 2018.

13. Illinois

Dmitry Kalinovsky / Shutterstock.com

Average annual wage: $30,410

Average hourly wage: $14.62

Number of these workers classified as full- or part-time employees: 87,220

With a total tax burden as of 13.18% of income, Illinois is the second-worst state for taxing low-income residents, Money Talks News reports.

12. North Dakota

Africa Studio / Shutterstock.com

Average annual wage: $30,740

Average hourly wage: $14.78

Number of these workers classified as full- or part-time employees: 6,370

North Dakota is the third-best state in which to raise a family, with No. 1 rankings for education and child care, as well as for socioeconomic factors like family salaries and affordable housing, according to Money Talks News.

The Peace Garden state also garners high marks for affordability and for health and safety.

11. Rhode Island

Diana Grytsku / Shutterstock.com

Average annual wage: $31,000

Average hourly wage: $14.91

Number of these workers classified as full- or part-time employees: 6,770

You may not find a sea of opportunities in the Ocean State, which has the 42nd-slowest-growing economy in the nation, according to Money Talks News.

Aging infrastructure and the high cost of doing business are two major factors in that low rating.

10. Vermont

Viacheslav Nikolaenko / Shutterstock.com

Average annual wage: $31,280

Average hourly wage: $15.04

Number of these workers classified as full- or part-time employees: 4,820

A declining population contributes to this state’s sluggish economy, Money Talks News reports.

Having the 13th-highest cost of living won’t help low-wage earners like janitors.

9. Hawaii

Martin Haas / Shutterstock.com

Average annual wage: $31,350

Average hourly wage: $15.07

Number of workers who are classified as full- or part-time employees: 12,860

The Aloha State is the third-worst state for the impact of taxes on low-income residents.

Low-income Hawaiians have a 12.94% total tax burden as a percentage of income, despite having the lowest effective real-estate property tax rate in the country.

8. Minnesota

Dmitry Kalinovsky / Shutterstock.com

Average annual wage: $31,680

Average hourly wage: $15.23

Number of these workers classified as full- or part-time employees: 46,850

With the highest median family salary (adjusted for cost of living) and high marks for health and safety, education and child care, the North Star State is ranked by WalletHub as the best state for raising a family, according to a Money Talks News report.

There’s ice fishing and hockey for outdoors enthusiasts and the Mall of America for shoppers, while the Twin Cities of Minneapolis and St. Paul offer lots of nightlife and cultural opportunities.

7. New Jersey

Siyanight / Shutterstock.com

Average annual wage: $31,700

Average hourly wage: $15.24

Number of these workers classified as full- or part-time employees: 67,380

The cities of Newark and Jersey City combine with neighboring New York City to have the highest number of janitors of any metropolitan area in the nation, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. The metro area boasted 186,460 janitors as of May 2018.

6. California

Komsan Loonprom / Shutterstock.com

Average annual wage: $33,570

Average hourly wage: $16.14

Number of these workers classified as full- or part-time employees: 230,750

Janitors here likely have a tough time making ends meet.

While janitors’ average hourly wage of $16.14 is higher than the state’s living wage for a one-person household ($14.61), it’s not cheap to live here. The Golden State has the third-highest cost of living in the country — trailing only Hawaii and the District of Columbia, according to the Missouri Economic and Research Information Center.

5. Alaska

Lenar Nigmatullin / Shutterstock.com

Average annual wage: $34,130

Average hourly wage: $16.41

Number of these workers classified as full- or part-time employees: 5,160

Taxes aren’t a big deal in the Last Frontier, a state with no income tax.

Middle- and high-income residents have the lowest tax burdens in the country, Money Talks News reports, and low-income residents have the second-lowest taxes in the U.S., with an overall tax burden of 5.87% of income.

4. Connecticut

Andrey_Popov / Shutterstock.com

Average annual wage: $34,360

Average hourly wage: $16.52

Number of these workers classified as full- or part-time employees: 29,290

It can’t be easy for low-paid janitors to make ends meet in Connecticut.

The state ranks among the nation’s 10 most-expensive in which to live, according to the Missouri Economic Research and Information Center’s cost of living analysis.

3. New York

Debby Wong / Shutterstock.com

Average annual wage: $35,080

Average hourly wage: $16.87

Number of these workers classified as full- or part-time employees: 190,600

In the Empire State, the living wage, which is the amount considered necessary for a basic standard of living, is the third-highest in the nation:

  • A one-person household needs $15.09 per hour to get by.
  • A household of two adults and two kids needs $21.17 per hour per working adult.

2. Washington

Andrey_Popov / Shutterstock.com

Average annual wage: $35,220

Average hourly wage: $16.93

Number of these workers classified as full- or part-time employees: 45,380

Unfortunately for janitors in Washington state, a sizable chunk of their pay must go to taxes.

The Evergreen State has the worst overall tax burden for low-income residents. Overall, they pay 14.59% of their income to state taxes (sales, excise and property tax), despite not having a state income tax.

1. Massachusetts

Andrey_Popov / Shutterstock.com

Average annual wage: $35,560

Average hourly wage: $17.10

Number of workers who are classified as full- or part-time employees: 54,670

Janitors here might not make a ton of money, but at least they live in the second-best state for raising a family, Money Talks News reports. Massachusetts ranks high in the areas of education and child care and for health and safety.

Weigh in with your thoughts about janitors’ pay at our Facebook page or in a comment below. Do we pay janitors enough to do the work of keeping our offices, hospitals and other buildings clean?

Donna Freedman contributed to this article.

Disclosure: The information you read here is always objective. However, we sometimes receive compensation when you click links within our stories.

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