11 Cities Where Worker Burnout Is Most Likely

Sad, stressed woman at work
Mangostar / Shutterstock.com

This story originally appeared on SmartAsset.

The days of the strict 40-hour workweek, with weekends and evenings spent relaxing, are a distant memory for many people.

According to Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) data from 2019, more than 10 million Americans work at least 60 hours per week. And for those lucky enough to have a job amid the COVID-19 pandemic, shelter-in-place rules have kept many working from home, a fact that has reduced the separation between the office and home-life.

In fact, recent data from NordVPN shows Americans are working three hours more per day during coronavirus lockdowns than before. Though the constant connectivity and persistent Zoom meetings may exacerbate exhaustion as workers grind to build up their savings, there are a whole host of factors that are fatiguing the workforce. With all that in mind, SmartAsset crunched the numbers to find the cities where worker burnout is most likely.

We analyzed the 100 largest U.S. cities across the following metrics:

  • Average number of weeks worked per year.
  • Average number of hours worked per week.
  • Percentage of the population working at least 1,700 hours per year (the equivalent of 35 hours per week for 51 weeks).
  • Percentage of workers with a commute longer than one hour.
  • Housing costs as a percentage of income.

All data comes from the Census Bureau’s 2018 one-year American Community Survey.

First, we ranked all cities for every metric. Giving them all an equal weight, we found each city’s average ranking. We used this average ranking to create our final score. The city with the highest average ranking (i.e., the city where worker burnout is most likely) received a score of 100 and the city with the lowest average ranking (i.e., the city where worker burnout is least likely) received a score of 0.

Following are the cities where worker burnout is most likely.

10. Austin, Texas (tie)

Austin, Texas
Roschetzky Photography / Shutterstock.com

Tied for the No. 10 spot on our list is Austin, Texas. The city has the ninth-highest average number of weeks worked per year, at 38.4, and the eighth-highest percentage of the population working more than 1,700 hours per year, at 58.8%.

10. Charlotte, North Carolina (tie)

Charlotte, North Carolina
Kevin M. McCarthy / Shutterstock.com

The other city tied for No. 10 is Charlotte, North Carolina. Charlotte ranks 10th out of 100 cities for the high percentage of its population working 1,700 hours per year, at 58.3%.

Additionally, workers there average 39.7 hours per week on the job, the 19th-highest rate for this metric in this study.

9. Seattle

Seattle skyline
Checubus / Shutterstock.com

Seattle has the third-highest rate in the study for its average number of weeks worked per year, at 39.7.

The Emerald City also comes in 17th of 100 for its relatively high percentage of workers putting in at least 1,700 hours to work each year, at 56.7%.

8. Dallas

Dallas, Texas
mandritoiu / Shutterstock.com

Dallas workers log an average of 40.7 hours per week on the job, the third-highest total of the cities we studied.

The city ranks toward the middle of the study for its average number of weeks worked in a year, at almost 36 weeks. Around 56.3% of workers in Dallas work more than 1,700 hours in a year.

7. Arlington, Virginia

Arlington, Virginia
Sean Pavone / Shutterstock.com

Arlington, Virginia, a suburb of Washington, D.C., has the highest rate in the study for the following three metrics: average number of weeks worked per year, at 41.3; average number of hours worked per week, at 41.7 and percentage of residents working more than 1,700 hours in a year, at 62%.

It may not be as stressful to live in Arlington when it comes to homeownership expenses, though, as housing costs are only about 20% of income, the ninth-lowest figure for this metric.

6. Denver

Denver, Colorado
f11photo / Shutterstock.com

Denver workers put in 39.6 weeks per year on the job, the fourth-highest rate for this metric in the study.

Denver also had the third-highest percentage overall of workers who logged at least 1,700 hours per year, at 59.5%. Employees there are at the office or on the job site for an average of 40 hours per week, the 14th-highest rate for this metric across all 100 cities we analyzed.

5. Washington, D.C.

Washington, D.C. traffic with Capitol Building in background
Atomazul / Shutterstock.com

Washington, D.C., has the ninth-highest number of average hours worked per week in this study, at 40.3 hours.

The city ranks 11th for its high percentage of residents working at least 1,700 hours per year, at 58.2%.

Workers in the nation’s capital spend an average of 36.9 weeks per year on the job, the 33rd-highest across all the cities we examined.

4. Miami

Miami Beach Ocean Drive at dusk
Tono Balaguer / Shutterstock.com

Miami workers might be relatively stressed out by their expenses, as housing costs represent 34.49% of income, the third-highest percentage in the study for this metric.

Miami ties with Jersey City, New Jersey, for the 19th-longest workweek, which is an average of 39.7 hours. Furthermore, it ranks 21st out of 100 for its relatively high percentage of workers with a commute of at least one hour, at 9.5%.

3. Jersey City, New Jersey

Jersey City, New Jersey
f11photo / Shutterstock.com

Right across the Hudson from New York City, Jersey City ranks in the worse half of the study for all metrics we considered.

It has the fourth-highest percentage in the study of workers who commute for more than an hour, at 19.5%. It also has the 19th-highest rate for average number hours worked per week, at 39.7.

Around 56.7% of workers in Jersey City are on the job at least 1,700 hours per year, the 17th-highest rate for this metric across all 100 cities we examined.

2. San Francisco

San Francisco
Sean Xu / Shutterstock.com

San Francisco workers are on the clock for an average of 39.8 weeks per year, the second-highest rate for this metric in the study.

They also work an average of 40.5 hours per week, the seventh-highest rate for this metric in the study. Around 59% of workers average more than 1,700 hours a year, the fifth-highest rate across all 100 cities we studied.

Additionally, San Francisco ranks 11th-worst overall for its relatively high percentage of workers with a severe commute (a commute longer than one hour), at 14.3%.

1. Aurora, Colorado

Aurora, Colorado
Steve Lagreca / Shutterstock.com

Aurora, Colorado, a suburb of Denver, is the city most prone to worker burnout. Residents there work an average of 38.5 weeks each year, the eighth-highest amount for this metric in our study.

Aurora also ranks in the bottom 20% for two other metrics: its high percentage of workers averaging at least 35 hours a week over 51 weeks — at 58% — and high percentage of workers with a commute of longer than an hour, at 9.7%.

Disclosure: The information you read here is always objective. However, we sometimes receive compensation when you click links within our stories.

Read Next
This Is the Best Time of Day to Take Blood Pressure Meds
This Is the Best Time of Day to Take Blood Pressure Meds

The right timing can help you prevent a big — and possibly fatal — mistake.

Never Buy These 10 Things With Your Credit Card
Never Buy These 10 Things With Your Credit Card

Credit cards offer many conveniences and protections, but sometimes it’s simply smarter to keep the plastic tucked away.

Prepare to Pay More for These 31 Drugs in 2021
Prepare to Pay More for These 31 Drugs in 2021

More than 700 prescription medications have seen price hikes so far this year. Here’s a look at the worst.

7 Other Retailers With Free Prescription Delivery
7 Other Retailers With Free Prescription Delivery

Amazon’s new pharmacy is hardly the first to offer free shipping.

11 Small Money Moves That Will Make a Big Difference
11 Small Money Moves That Will Make a Big Difference

These small money moves will pay off big in the long run.

View this page without ads

Help us produce more money-saving articles and videos by subscribing to a membership.

Get Started

Most Popular
10 Things Frugal People Never Buy
10 Things Frugal People Never Buy

If you’re a true tightwad, the mere thought of spending money on these items gives you the willies.

10 Useless Purchases You Need to Stop Making
10 Useless Purchases You Need to Stop Making

You might as well flush your money down the loo if you spend it on these things.

7 Social Security Rules Everyone Should Know by Now
7 Social Security Rules Everyone Should Know by Now

Confusion over Social Security is a shame, considering how many of us will need this money badly.

Why Your Next Stimulus Check Might Be Bigger Than You Expect
Why Your Next Stimulus Check Might Be Bigger Than You Expect

Your third coronavirus payment will be the biggest yet — and possibly even bigger than you realize.

9 Shopping Mistakes to Avoid at Costco
9 Shopping Mistakes to Avoid at Costco

Are you missing out on serious savings at your favorite warehouse club?

If You Find This Thrift Shopping, Buy It
If You Find This Thrift Shopping, Buy It

They don’t make coffee makers like this anymore.

The 16 Cars Most Likely to Last 200,000 Miles
The 16 Cars Most Likely to Last 200,000 Miles

One automaker takes half the spots on a list of the longest-lasting vehicles.

3 Ways to Get Microsoft Office for Free
3 Ways to Get Microsoft Office for Free

With a little ingenuity, you can cut Office costs to zero.

14 Things You Should Stop Buying in 2021
14 Things You Should Stop Buying in 2021

These convenient household products come with hidden costs that you might not have considered.

Is Writing a Check Still Safe?
Is Writing a Check Still Safe?

Every time you pay by check, you hand your bank account numbers to a stranger.

6 Ways to Protect Your Retirement Accounts From Hackers
6 Ways to Protect Your Retirement Accounts From Hackers

Imagine having $245,000 stolen from your retirement account — and not being reimbursed.

8 Things You Should Replace to Improve Your Life Today
8 Things You Should Replace to Improve Your Life Today

Being frugal isn’t smart if you put off replacing these items.

13 Amazon Purchases We Are Loving Right Now
13 Amazon Purchases We Are Loving Right Now

These practical products make everyday life a little easier.

This Is the Most Dependable Car Brand in the U.S.
This Is the Most Dependable Car Brand in the U.S.

This brand’s vehicles are least likely to give drivers repair headaches, according to J.D. Power.

7 Social Security Benefits You May Be Overlooking
7 Social Security Benefits You May Be Overlooking

There’s more to Social Security than retirement benefits.

The 6 Best Investing Apps for Beginners
The 6 Best Investing Apps for Beginners

If you’re looking to ease into investing in the coronavirus economy with just a little money, check out these easy-to-use tools.

7 Hidden Sections of Amazon Every Shopper Should Know
7 Hidden Sections of Amazon Every Shopper Should Know

These little-known departments of Amazon are gold mines for deal-seekers and impulse shoppers alike.

7 Income Tax Breaks That Retirees Often Overlook
7 Income Tax Breaks That Retirees Often Overlook

Did you realize all these tax credits and deductions exist — or that they apply to retirees?

7 Kirkland Signature Items to Avoid at Costco
7 Kirkland Signature Items to Avoid at Costco

Even if it seems you save a bundle buying Costco’s Kirkland Signature brand products, they may not be the bargain they appear to be.

View More Articles

View this page without ads

Help us produce more money-saving articles and videos by subscribing to a membership.

Get Started

Add a Comment

Our Policy: We welcome relevant and respectful comments in order to foster healthy and informative discussions. All other comments may be removed. Comments with links are automatically held for moderation.