How Much Do You Need to Earn to Afford an Apartment in Each State?

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Finding a new apartment can be exciting — checking out the amenities, exploring a new neighborhood, setting up your furniture in a new place. But affording the rent is a serious issue for many. Housing is defined as “affordable” by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development if it costs no more than 30 percent of your monthly income — thus leaving enough for other essentials.

Workers earning the federal minimum wage, even working 40 hours a week, won’t make enough money to affordably rent a modest two-bedroom apartment in any state, according to the 2018 Out of Reach report, published by the National Low Income Housing Coalition, a housing advocacy group. The report draws on data from U.S. counties. One-bedroom apartments, too, are unaffordable for most people working full time and earning the federal minimum wage.

Where does your state stand? Here is the coalition’s ranking of the 50 states and the District of Columbia for apartment affordability, from the most-affordable state to the least.

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