8 Profitable Ways to Get Rid of Aging Electronic Devices

Sometimes, you can collect money for your old gadgets. Other options simply allow you to help protect the planet.

8 Profitable Ways to Get Rid of Aging Electronic Devices Photo by Lipik Stock Media / Shutterstock.com

Americans love their electronic gadgets. Peek into any home, and you’ll find everything from old standbys like TVs and computers, to more cutting-edge technologies such as iPhones and wearables.

Of course, today’s sleek new electronic toy can quickly become tomorrow’s has-been. What can you do when it’s time to get rid of that aging device?

Following are eight options. Some help you collect a little green for your wallet. Others simply allow you to help maintain the Earth, or to do a little good for a charity. Choose the option that makes most sense for you.

Sell it at Gazelle

Tell Gazelle about your old electronics, and you should receive an offer for the items in mere minutes. You can sell everything from a cellphone to a Mac computer. If your item is worth $1 or more, it ships for free. Or, you can drop it off at a Gazelle kiosk.

Payment is in the form of an Amazon gift card, PayPal deposit or check. Provide your email address to Gazelle, and you’ll get $5 on your first trade-in valued at more than $50.

Sell it at NextWorth

NextWorth offers another way to trade your old electronics for cash. Sell smartphones, laptops, portable audio and more. Payment typically is by check or PayPal deposit.

As with Gazelle, you’ll receive a quote for your item quickly, and shipping is free. If you prefer to drop off your item, NextWorth has partnerships with Meijer and Nebraska Furniture Mart.

Trade it in at Amazon

Did you know that Amazon will take your old electronics in exchange for a gift card? And you don’t have to stop there — Amazon also accepts used books, DVDs, video games and more.

There are no fees to ship the item to Amazon. If the retailer decides not to take you item, it will return it fee-free.

Use Sprint’s buyback program

Take your old cellphone, ship it to Sprint for free, and you’ll receive a credit on your bill. You can also drop off the item at a Sprint retail location.

Best of all, you can even bring in devices from another carrier.

Drop it off at Best Buy

Best Buy recycles electronics and appliances at its retail locations. In fact, the retailer says it collects 400 pounds of product for every minute it is open.

Step inside the store, and you’ll notice a kiosk that allows you to recycle items such as:

  • Rechargeable batteries
  • Wires
  • Cords
  • Cables
  • Plastic bags

Other electronics typically can be recycled at the customer service counter.

Best Buy also will haul away TVs and major appliances from your home for a $14.99 fee if you purchase a similar item from the retailer.

Find a location to recycle it via Call2Recycle

This website helps you recycle cellphones and alkaline and rechargeable batteries at locations around the country. Just enter your ZIP code at the Call2Recycle website, and you’ll get a list of drop-off locations.

You’ll also find a handy guide to recycling laws by state.

Drop it off during a special collection day

Many locales across the U.S. host special days when people can drop off their used electronics for recycling.

To find out when your community will host such an event, stop by the TIA E-cycling Central website. The site also provides a list of locations that offer recycling throughout the year.

Donate it to charity

Several charities will take your old electronics off your hands and resell them for a good cause. Just be sure to permanently wipe all personal data from your device before you donate it!

Options include:

  • Goodwill. The charity has partnered with Dell Reconnect to accept all manner of electronics, including computers. Goodwill also pledges to wipe the hard drives of donated computers “to the standards of the United States Department of Defense.”
  • AmericanCellphoneDrive.org. This organization helps you donate your used cellphone to a worthy organization in your community. Or, you can simply find an organization that will recycle your phone for you.

What do you do with your old electronic devices? Let us know by commenting below or on our Facebook page.

Disclosure: The information you read here is always objective. However, we sometimes receive compensation when you click links within our stories.

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