15 Places Where You Are Most Likely to Catch Coronavirus

Friends watching a game at a sports bar
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We would all like to know where we are most likely to catch the coronavirus. Armed with such knowledge, we could simply make sure we never go there.

Now, doctors are describing the places and activities that leave you most vulnerable to catching the virus that causes the COVID-19 disease.

Recently, the Texas Medical Association‘s COVID-19 Task Force and its Committee on Infectious Diseases asked member physicians to rank places and activities based on how risky they are for transmission of the coronavirus.

The doctors used a scale of 1 to 10 to rate the level of risk, with a rating of “1” indicating the lowest level of risk and “10” indicating the highest level.

Some activities only rated a “1” or “2” — such as opening the mail or getting restaurant takeout, respectively. But others were considerably more dangerous.

While no activity rates a “10,” eight activities rated a “9” or “8” on the scale. They are:

  • Going to a bar: 9
  • Attending a religious service with 500-plus worshippers: 9
  • Going to a sports stadium: 9
  • Attending a large music concert: 9
  • Going to a movie theater: 8
  • Going to an amusement park: 8
  • Working out at a gym: 8
  • Eating at a buffet: 8

In addition, seven other activities rated a “7” on the 10-point scale. They are:

  • Going to a hair salon or barbershop
  • Eating in a restaurant (inside)
  • Attending a wedding or funeral
  • Traveling by plane
  • Playing basketball
  • Playing football
  • Hugging or shaking hands when greeting a friend

The task force notes that these risk levels apply to people who are “following currently recommended safety protocols when possible.” So, don’t think you can engage in these activities safely if you simply exercise a little extra caution.

Staying safe from the coronavirus

COVID-19 poses a serious threat to all of us. But there are things we all can do to keep the coronavirus from wreaking havoc.

Understanding your own personal risk level is a crucial starting place. Younger, healthier people have less to fear than those with underlying health issues. And seniors are especially vulnerable.

For more, check out “Seniors With These 5 Diseases Are Most Often Hospitalized for COVID-19.”

Regardless of your risk level, there are things all of us should do to help lower our risk of infection. Some are obvious — such as washing your hands regularly.

But others easily can be overlooked. For more, read:

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